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Making Herstory At Austin Pride With Jackie Huba

Making Herstory At Austin Pride With Jackie Huba- About Magazine

 

Jackie Huba Makes History As First Female Drag Queen To Perform At Austin Pride Celebration

So many of us are controlled by our bosses, lovers and friends who convince us we aren’t smart enough, pretty enough, or strong enough. Not anymore! In a new book titled, FIERCELY YOU: Be Fabulous and Confident by Thinking Like a Drag Queen, author and TEDx speaker Jackie Huba is handing out lessons and teaching how to apply ‘bold drag queen’ tactics into our everyday lives.  By putting honey where her mouth is, she will take the stage of Austin Pride on Saturday, August 27 to prove just how courageous she can be, performing as her drag persona, Lady Trinity.

About Magazine: You’re making history as the first female drag queen to ever perform on the main stage at the Austin PRIDE Festival!  Jackie Huba: I’m truly honored, to say the least. I don’t want to spoil the surprise, but it will be unlike any performance I’ve ever done. Given we are right in the middle of a political season, I decided to do a topical theme. So just imagine a pantsuit-wearing badass showing an orange-faced character who’s boss.

 

 

 

About Magazine: How did you find drag?Jackie Huba: Stumbling upon RuPaul’s Drag Race was what led me to my admiration of these fearless drag artists. I began going to the local drag shows in Austin and San Antonio and began meeting the local queens. Then drag event promoter Rey Lopez connected me with the top drag queen in Austin, Kelly Kline, who volunteered to be my drag mother. She spent countless hours teaching me everything a drag performer needs to know: theatrical makeup, wig styling, costuming and lip-sync.Making-Herstory-At-Austin-Pride-With-Jackie-Huba-576x1024 Making Herstory At Austin Pride With Jackie Huba

About Magazine: You’ve gotten incredible support from the drag community.  Jackie Huba: The drag community is extremely accepting of women who do drag. They’ve told me they love seeing anyone love the art form as much as they do.

About Magazine: What are the 5 Keys to Fierce that you write about in your book? Jackie Huba: They are the lessons I have learned. First, Create Your Drag Persona: consciously create the person you’ve always wanted to be. Then, Always Look Sickening in Everyday Drag: dress for power. After that, Strike a Pose and Embody Your Power: use power posing and physicality to instill inner confidence. Then Tell Your Critics to Sashay Away: quiet both inner and outer critics. And lastly, honey, You Better Werk! Take small risks to propel yourself to taking even bigger ones. 

About Magazine: These are lessons anyone can put to use in their everyday lives. Jackie Huba: Exactly! At work and in their personal lives. The Keys work because they are all rooted in psychological principles. For the book, I collaborated with a licensed therapist, Shelly Stewart Kronbergs, who breaks down the psychological research into layman’s terms.

About Magazine: Good luck at Austin Pride!  Jackie Huba: Thank you! Austin PRIDE is a terrific organization. I’m honored and humbled to have been selected to perform this year, alongside such amazing artists!


Jackie Huba aka Lady Trinity performs at the Austin PRIDE Festival on Saturday, August 27, with RuPaul’s Drag Race Season 8 Winner Bob the Drag Queen, Miss Texas All-American Goddess Kelly Kline, and the newly crowned Miss Austin Pride 2016 Vegas Van Cartier. 

Jackie Huba’s FIERCELY YOU: Be Fabulous and Confident by Thinking Like a Drag Queen releases August 15. For more info, visit http://enterthequeendom.com.

UT Students Protest Campus Open Carry Law By Carrying Dildos

UT Students Protest Campus Open Carry Law By Carrying Dildos

University Of Texas Students Protesting Texas Law Known As “Campus Carry”  By Highlighting What You Can’t Carry: A Harmless Dildo.

Texas law known as S.B. 11, passed by a Republican led legislature and signed into law by the amazing Texas governor Greg Abbott, has went into effect, as of August 1, 2016. 3,500+ students at the University of Texas signed up to carry around dildos on their backpacks in protest of the new law.

Here’s an excerpt from the protest’s #CocksNotGlocks Facebook page: “Starting on the first day of Long Session classes on August 24, 2016, we are strapping gigantic swinging dildos to our backpacks in protest of campus carry.

Anyone can participate in solidarity: alum, non-UT students, people outside of Texas. Come one dildo, come all dildos.“You’re carrying a gun to class? Yeah well I’m carrying a HUGE DILDO.” Just about as effective at protecting us from sociopathic shooters, but much safer for recreational play.

Protest organizer Jessica Lin, has pointed out a Texas law which states that anyone displaying or distributing “obscene” materials (such as a dildo) in public can be issued a $500 fine. A law she thinks is hypocritical:

“The State of Texas has decided that it is not at all obnoxious to allow deadly concealed weapons in classrooms, however it DOES have strict rules about free sexual expression, to protect your innocence.“You would receive a citation for taking a DILDO to class before you would get in trouble for taking a gun to class.

“Heaven forbid the penis.”

Houston LGBTQ Community Steps Up Following Hurricane Harvey

Houston LGBTQ Community Steps Up Following Hurricane Harvey

LGBT Houston Shines Following Hurricane Harvey: Looking At The True Acts Of Kindness From The Houston LGBTQ+ Community After One Of The Worst Hurricanes In American History


A Special Two Part Series


(HOUSTON) — Standing outside Houston’s LGBTQ community center, The Montrose Center, in the early afternoon of Thursday, August 24th, you could see Hurricane Harvey was approaching Houston. The sky was dark, and the winds had arrived. The rainfall would come only hours later and would last for several days without relent until Wednesday, August 30, 2017.

During and in the wake of the storm an innumerable amount of Houstonians lost their homes, vehicles, pets, possessions, while some even less fortunate lost their lives and those close to them. Our great city was devastated!

The attention of the entire nation turned to Texas. With that attention, came the influx of aid from all over. Louisiana’s Cajun Navy responded to need, shuttling down boats and volunteers to rescue people from the deadly flooding. According to the National Weather Service, areas of Houston received over 50” of rain.

“I wanted to feel like I could do something. We all felt powerless. We can’t do anything to stop a hurricane, but we can do something afterward.”– Michael Glazner

The American Red Cross set up the state’s largest shelter-in-place at Houston’s downtown George R. Brown convention center. Initially housing 10,000 evacuees, other facilities were opened including NRG Arena and the Toyota Center.

Hurricane Harvey’s devastation became infamous with celebrities such as Kevin Hart, Sandra Bullock, Chelsea Handler, and Ellen DeGeneres contributing large sums of money to relief efforts. Cristela Alonzo, comedian, and actress from Texas and an adamant LGBTQ+ ally went so far as to research shelter locations needing supplies and volunteers.

ABTHarvey-223x300 Houston LGBTQ Community Steps Up Following Hurricane HarveyAs an estimated 32,000 people were displaced from their homes in Harris County, Houston’s truest acts of heroism from local citizens began to shine. NRG, George R. Brown, Houston Food Bank, Pets Alive, to BARC and Gallery Furniture and many other facilities set up as shelters were inundated with volunteers.

As #HurricaneHarvey pounded Houston with rain, members of Houston’s LGBT pride organization, Pride Houston, Inc., went into action collecting contributions and left over supplies (from Houston’s June Pride Celebration) for delivery to the George R. Brown Convention Center for people in need. Items like bottled water, clothing were donated.

In the days since the storm social media has been overwhelmed with photos and posts from Houston’s LGBTQ+ community. Images of volunteers helping one another, and posts details someone’s random acts of kindness. There are so many.

“It seems like our community has either had to step up for themselves for so many years or by extension have gotten used to stepping up for other people and helping out,” former ‘Friends of Pride’ committee co-chair Michael Glazner said to About Magazine.

“I’m impressed, honored, and privileged to be a part of this community, ”  Glazner said. Glazner was one of many Pride Houston, Inc. volunteers that assisted during Hurricane Harvey.

Candlelight Vigil Held in Houston for Gay Man Beaten To Death

candle light vigil austin texas

Candlelight Vigil Held in Houston for Gay Man Beaten To Death

HOUSTON, TX —It was only four months ago that 18-year-old  Stephen Roy Sylvester, Jr moved from Houston to Austin for family and education. His plans included studying at Austin Community College, and then University of Texas.

Today local, state, national and world news outlets focused on his death ranging from the The New York Daily News, USA Today, The Washington TimesCBS News, and Instinct Magazine.

In Houston on Sunday, the people that knew him best and loved him- paid their respects with a candle light vigil. His pictures were scattered, and surrounded by candles. His friends sat silently in a circle. Their hearts were broken. One  of the guys in the crowd was Taylor Shirley.

Every single piece of news coverage of this horrible loss; Shirley is mentioned as a “friend,” but that is almost as painful as the loss Shirley is feeling. Every reporter refers to me as a ‘friend’ he told us.

Shirley was the boyfriend for almost a year before Stephen moved. “He was larger than life. He walked into a room and filled it up in the best way.” says Shirley.  “He was the type of person that if you were walking past him and he noticed you looking sad, he would stop you and ask to talk about it.” Shirley tells About Magazine.

Shirley fondly remembered Sylvester’s tenderness and understanding for people, particularly those in the transgender community.

Stephen lived with Shirley in Spring, Texas and attended Klein Collins High School before he moved to Austin.