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Popular College Station Gay Bar To Re-Open After Fire

Halo Bar College Station- About Magazine

Popular College Station Gay Bar To Re-Open After Fire

(College Station , TX) The popular LGBT bar Halo went up in flames in late July of this year and has remained closed. But not for much longer as owner Jeff Harmon gets the popular club ready to rise from the ashes.

The two story club located at 121 N. Main St in Bryan, Tx caught fire in the early morning of July 18, 2015. The fire started on the second floor according to the fire marshals office from a faulty power strip. Much of the upstairs was destroyed, and the first floor, which hosts a television bar and lounge, had smoke and water damage.

“I didn’t know what to expect,” said general manager Michael Burleson about his reaction when he first saw the damage. “I didn’t think it would be as bad as it was, but when I went upstairs and saw what was there, I was devastated.” Burleson told The Eagle

Burleson said he has worked for Halo for 10 years, and was amazed at how a part of his life could be destroyed in just a matter of minutes. Burleson said he is optimistic about the future of Halo, however, despite the losses and temporary closure.

The first floor is undergoing repairs and is almost finished, Harmon said. Most of what still needs to be done on the first floor is cosmetic, though Sheetrock had to be replaced and much of the inside of the building is “stripped down to the studs.” Harmon anticipates the first floor will be ready to reopen for business within four to six weeks, and the second floor a month after that. According to The Eagle.

Harmon said he plans to schedule a soft opening for the downstairs portion of Halo, and then host a large grand-opening party once the second floor is ready to receive patrons.

“There is no club atmosphere like Halo,” Harmon said. “It’s the Rolls-Royce of clubs around here.”

Transgender Day of Remembrance

Transgender Day of Remembrance 2017

A note from the editor-in-chief.

Today is 18th annual Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDoR). It is a day not only to be acknowledged by the world’s trans community, but by the world as a whole. This is because trans people should not be pigeonholed to just their community, or even just to the LGBTQIA community. Just like cisgender people, transgender people are just … people.

Trans Day of Remembrance has been annually recognized since 1999, when it was established by trans advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith. Smith started the memorialization in response to the murder of Rita Hester, a trans woman who was murdered the year before. In the years since its inception, TDoR has become a vigil not only for Hester, but for all the trans people who have lost their lives to violence in the years since.

Today, we can see that violence against the trans community has not changed much. In 2017, 25 trans people have been victim to a fatal crime, including Texas’s own Stephanie Montez, a 47-year-old trans woman from Robstown. The majority of those people were trans women of color; and those numbers are up by 2 from 2016, with still a month and a half of the year left to go before the beginning of 2018.

The names of the people lost in 2017 are as follows: Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow (28), Mesha Caldwell (41), Sean Hake (age unknown), Jojo Striker (23), Tiara Lashaytheboss Richmond (24), Jaquarrius Holland (18), Chyna Doll Dupree (31), Ciara McElveen (21), Alphonza Watson (38), Chayviss Reed (age unknown), Kenneth Bostick (59), Sherrell Faulkner (46), Kenne McFadden (26), Josie Berrios (28), Ava Le Ray Barrin (17), Ebony Morgan (28), Troy “Tee Tee” Dangerfield (32), Gwenyvere River Song (26), Kiwi Herring (30), Kashmire Redd (28), Derricka Banner (26), Ally Steinfeld (17), Stephanie Montez (47), and Candace Towns (30).

Sadly, the attitude toward the trans community around the country is not generally improving – especially so with a president in the Oval Office who perpetuates antiquated and ridiculous stereotypes about the trans community by trying to ban trans servicemen and women from the military. From there, it trickles down. It trickles down to his supporters, those who are unsure of him, but who still listen, and then to the children of all of those people. Children who, if I might add, we should be educating about equality, about not seeing gender identity or sexual orientation or color or religion or nationality.

That’s why here at About Magazine, I’m making it a personal mission to make About Magazine + About News just as inclusive of our trans community as it is of the lesbian, bisexual, gay, and pansexual community. We will also be more inclusive of the intersex and asexual communities, so that no one is left behind.

To do so, we will be launching in 2018 our first page on the website for trans-only content, aptly titled About Trans. Currently, we are looking for trans writers and editors to be a part of this initiative. Until then, I will oversee it. However, I am a cis person, and in order for this operation to be genuine and authentic, it is my earnest belief that this portion of our site should be trans-run. If you or anyone you know would like to be a part of About Trans, feel free to email me at anthony@about-online.com.

Going forward, let’s remember what today stands for, and remind ourselves and our trans friends, neighbors, and loved ones that they are just as important as anyone else, and that we’re there to aid them if they should ever need it in any way. Give them your love, and give them your support, because they are just as much a part of the LGBTQIA community as anyone else that falls into any of those other categories. And if you don’t believe this to be true, read a little bit of our content today so that you can understand why trans people are so important to the queer cause. Because as genderqueer activist and musician C.N. Lester said, “Even when we are confused about someone’s gender, and don’t have a greater awareness of what it means to be trans, we have a choice to respond with kindness rather than cruelty.”

Choose kindness.

Choose community.

Choose love.

 

Anthony Ramirez

Editor-in-Chief

 

For more information on Transgender Day of Remembrance, visit the GLADD website here. 

Transgender Woman Found Murdered In Austin

AUSTIN, Texas — Austin’s LGBT+ community is mourning the tragic murder of a transgender woman found shot to death on her front door steps on January 22. It’s the city’s first murder of 2016, and the nations first murder of a Transgender woman for 2016.

The victim has been identified as Monica Loera. Austin Police Department are identifying the victim as a man.

rowell-256x300 Transgender Woman Found Murdered In AustinAccording to the police report, the victims roommate told police that Rowell “kept knocking on the door and Loera said ‘he was going to get rid of him because he didn’t want to mess with him.’ When the victim went to open the door, the roommate said he heard a sound like a firecracker and Loera said, ‘he shot me.’”

After the shooting, Loera was taken to the University Medical Center Brackenridge hospital “where she was pronounced dead from her injuries and the Travis County Medical Examiner ruled Loera’s death a homicide

Austin Police has arrested Jon Casey William Rowell in connection with her death.

Rowell is facing a charge of first-degree murder. His bond is set at $250,000.

About Adds New Editors, New Business

2018 Will Bring New Editors Into About Magazine, About Editions, The Magazine’s Publishing Company.

(HOUSTON) – In addition to its new trans-specific content page, About Magazine will be adding two new editors to its staff in 2018. The first of which is Jessica Olsen, who will serve as the assistant editor for About Magazine under editor-in-chief, Anthony Ramirez. The second of which will be Ian Townsley, who will serve as the associate editor for About’s trans-content page, About Trans. Additionally, Ramirez’s publishing company, Black Magic Media, will be absorbed by About Magazine in December. The new publishing company will be a branch of About Magazine, called About Editions.

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Olsen has worked with Ramirez at Black Magic Media as the editor of fiction. Her responsibilities will include content editing and generating creative ideas for new content. Though not LGBTQIA herself, Olsen is an avid supporter of LGBTQIA rights and an ally to the entire community.

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Townsley is an outspoken advocate for the trans community who hosts support groups at the Montrose Center and local churches around Houston. He is also a drag king who performs in and puts on numerous benefits to serve the trans community in obtaining gender-affirmative surgery. Additionally, he has taken on the endeavor of helping trans people legally change their gender status. Syder-Blake himself is an out trans man.

Though Black Magic Media was not strictly LGBTQIA content before (though many of its titles were written by queer writers), it will be after it’s first season of books. The first book, a collection of poetry by Short Story America prize winner Mathieu Cailler (May I Have This Dance?) will be released December 14th, 2017. The remaining books to be published throughout 2018 are How to Break My Neck (Jessica L. Walsh), Heart Radicals (Les Kay, Sandra Marchetti, Allie Marini, and Janeen Rastall), Lifelong Learning (Ezekiel Jarvis), the second edition of Ramirez’s novel Witches of the Deep SouthSpace Baby (Nicole Oquendo), Nesting (Kristen Figgins), Lady Leda’s Dancing Girls (Amber Edmondson), q & a (Steven and Ben Ostrowski), i was born dead (Caseyrenée Lopez), Maleficium (Witches of the Deep South #2 (Ramirez), Naomi and the Reckoning (Christine Stoddard), and Shotgun Mirage (David Rawson).

Mathieu Cailler’s May I Have This Dance can be pre-ordered here.

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