Dallas | Ft. Worth

Home Dallas | Ft. Worth
Award-Winning News Coverage For Dallas | Ft. Worth From About Magazine.

Celebration Community Church in Fort Worth breaks ground on expansion

Members of the Celebration Community Church Board of Directors join Rev. Carol A. West to turn the first shovelful of dirt to commence construction on a new community center in Fort Worth. (Photo courtesy of Celebration Community Church.)
Members of the Celebration Community Church Board of Directors join Rev. Carol A. West to turn the first shovelful of dirt to commence construction on a new community center in Fort Worth. (Photo courtesy of Celebration Community Church.)

Celebration Community Church in Fort Worth breaks ground on expansion

The largest nondenominational church catering to the LGBT community in Tarrant County broke ground on a new facility for the LGBT community yesterday (Sunday, Aug. 23).

Once completed, leaders with Celebration Community Church say the Rev. Carol A. West Community Center will create a safe and inclusive space for the LGBT community.

New features will include more meeting space, enhanced recreational facilities and community gardens and a columbarium where church members can be laid to rest.

The church’s board voted to name the new building in honor West, who celebrates her 17th anniversary at the church this month.

“Quite often Rev. West speaks to us about stepping out on groundless ground,” said Ron Hill, chair of the board of directors. “It’s appropriate for us to remember that message as we step out in faith to build a church facility that will accommodate not only our growing congregation, but also the increasing number of GLBT community groups that rely on Celebration for meeting space.”

The new addition will include a formal entry lobby on the northwest corner of the property that will lead visitors to two large meeting rooms that, when combined, will accommodate 400 people.

The new structure will be tied to the existing sanctuary via a covered walkway.

Fundraising for the facility has been underway for the past few years.

Construction is expected to be completed in spring 2016.

First Texas LGBTQ Historical Marker in Dallas

LGBTQ HISTORICAL MARKER DALLAS CEDAR SPRINGS

The first-ever LGBTQ historical marker in Dallas was erected last month at the corner of Cedar Springs and Throckmorton in the Oak Lawn “gayborhood” of Dallas, Texas to the surprise and joy of many.

(DALLAS) — On October 10th, 2018, a historical plaque was placed on the corner of Cedar Springs and Throckmorton in the Oak Lawn neighborhood of Dallas, Texas. Most people would see the plaque as just another historical marker showing the history behind another longstanding building, but it is far from just that. This brand-new historical plaque placed in front of JR’s Bar and Grill represents the major gathering place for the LGBTQ community in Dallas.

The Oak Lawn neighborhood, or the “Gayborhood” as it is lovingly referred to, has been a thriving LGBTQ community since the 1950’s and constantly entertaining Texas’s largest—and even one of America’s largest—Queer communities. Because Oak Lawn is an area that is known for its high activism, causing and acting on change, and the gathering of a major minority group the Texas Historical Commission turned its sights on preserving and teaching the rest of Texas about this significant neighborhood. The neighborhood is not as well known to people outside of the LGBTQ community, but the historical context of Oak Lawn was too rich to pass up by the Texas Historical Commission and, sub sequentially, Preservation Texas. These Commissions were looking to highlight more disenfranchised and lesser known communities because these are untold stories in Texas’s history and deserve to be emphasized for all of Texans to learn and know about.

File_001 First Texas LGBTQ Historical Marker in Dallas

The Commission and Preservation’s plan for the historical marker has been more than two years in the making, and with this plaque being erected it starts the movement towards commemorations of historically disenfranchised populations and communities all over Texas. And while Texas and Texans have been stubborn about their beliefs in the past, there is a substantial change within the population. Texas has always been a state of hard-working individuals who are notorious for their tenacity and spirit, and this is absolutely paralleled in the LGBTQ community of Texas.

The recognition of Oak Lawn as a historical and inspirational neighborhood in Dallas shows that the area has been standing strong and bravely in the face of heavy stigma for decades. The knowledge of this community is now there in a physical way, even if the community moves to a different area of Dallas, and young queer people will see the plaque and be proud to see their community represented so transparently, so permanently, in the historical texts of Texas.

The complete text of the Historical Marker reads:

THE CROSSROADS

DESPITE DALLAS’S REPUTATION AS ONE OF THE STATE’S MORE CONSERVATIVE CITIES, ITS LGBTQ (LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER, QUEER) COMMUNITY WAS AMONG THE FIRST IN TEXAS TO ORGANIZE POLITICALLY AND SOCIALLY. IN 1947, THE CITY BECAME HOME TO ONE OF THE FIRST GAY BARS IN TEXAS, CLUB RENO, AND IN 1972 WAS THE SITE OF THE FIRST GAY PRIDE PARADE IN TEXAS. IN 1980, THE PRIDE PARADE MOVED FROM DOWNTOWN TO CEDAR SPRINGS ROAD.

THE AREA SURROUNDING THE INTERSECTION OF THROCKMORTON STREET AND CEDAR SPRINGS ROAD HAS BEEN CONSIDERED THE CENTER OF THE DALLAS LGBTQ COMMUNITY SINCE THE EARLY 1970s AND IS KNOWN AS “THE GAY CROSSROADS” OR “THE CROSSROADS.” IN THE LATE 1960s AND EARLY 1970s, THE CROSSROADS WAS A MAGNET FOR THE CITY’S COUNTERCULTURE MOVEMENTS. GAYS AND LESBIANS BEGAN MOVING TO THE AREA, DRAWN TO ITS BOHEMIAN IMAGE AND PICTURESQUE ARCHITECTURE. MORE GAY-OWNED BUSINESSES AND BARS FOLLOWED, AND BY THE END OF THE 1970s, THE MAJORITY OF BUSINESSES IN THE AREA CATERED TO THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY. WITH THE ONSLAUGHT OF THE AIDS CRISIS IN THE 1980s, THE CROSSROADS BECAME NOT ONLY AN ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT, BUT ALSO A CENTER FOR POLITICAL ACTIVISM, SOCIAL SERVICES AND MEDICAL TESTING.

AS THE HISTORIC HEART OF THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY OF DALLAS, THE CROSSROADS REMAINS THE LOCATION OF THE OLDEST GAY BUSINESSES IN THE CITY AND AS THE PRIMARY GATHERING POINT FOR LGBTQ POLITICAL AND SOCIAL EVENTS, INCLUDING THE ALAN ROSS FREEDOM PARADE. THE CROSSROADS CONTINUES TO SERVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD AND THE CITY OF DALLAS AS A SYMBOL OF SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ACTION AMONG THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY.

Dallas Sheriff Surprised By Her Partner With Massive Birthday Gift

Dallas Sheriff Receives Birthday Gift From Girlfriend. (Photo courtesy of @NaomiMartin Dallas Reporter)

Open Gay Sheriff of Dallas, Texas Was Surprised By Her Girlfriend Outside The Dallas Morning News With An Awesome Gift Early Birthday Gift!

DALLAS Oct. 2 — Walking out of The Dallas Morning News offices on Friday, Sheriff Lupe Valdez was speaking to a reporter when she noticed her girlfriend standing beside a red 2016 Tesla Model S.

According to the Dallas Morning News, Lupe was shocked when her girlfriend, Lindsay Browning explained, “Your birthday present came early.” In shock, the Sheriff inspected the new car, which lists between $66,000 to $135,000.

The Sheriff officially turns 69 on Oct. 11. Browning, a chiropractor, and owner of Urban Hippie Chiropractic, in Oak Cliff said she got the Sheriff ‘what she had always wanted.’ Browning stated Valdez had been considering the car for five years or more.

“It’s hard to surprise her because so many people are in charge of her life,” Browning told The Dallas Morning News.

 

Intersex Awareness Day 2017

Intersex Awareness Day 2017
A graphic created by Anthony Ramirez for Intersex Awareness Day 2017.

Everything you need to know about what it means to be intersex on Intersex Awareness Day

(HOUSTON) — For many in the LGBTQ community, there’s a tendency to forget that the spectrum doesn’t stop at the Q. In fact, the acronym often includes a + at the end, to maintain inclusivity of all the people who aren’t abbreviated in the acronym. However it is seldom remembered that LGBTQ+ is actually LGBTQIA: lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex, and asexual.

Many of these terms have been imbedded into our memory by now. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual are the most simple to understand for people outside the community, with trans seeming new to straight, cis-gender people (it’s not new, by the way). Asexuality could be perceived as simple explain to anyone who has no grasp on the subject. But when the word ‘intersex’ is thrown around, most people (including many in the LGBTQIA community) don’t have a clear understanding of what being intersex means.

Today, October 26th is National Intersex Awareness Day. The date marks fourteen years since the Intersex Society of North America (which ceased operations last year in 2016) first commemorated of the event back in 2003. The significance of October 26th, however, comes from that very date back in 1996 when the first public demonstration of intersex awareness was made in Boston by the ISNA. Despite the dissolving of the ISNA, October 26th (as well as National Intersex Day of Solidarity on November 8th) are currently maintained and promoted by the the Intersex Day Project, headed by Morgan Carpenter and Laura Inter since 2015.

Still, the question remains for many people within and outside of the community: what exactly is it to be intersex? Many people (wrongly) associate being intersex with being trans. This is not the case. In fact, it’s completely different altogether. So, to help spread awareness and clear up these misconceptions about being intersex on Intersex Awareness Day, I’ve compiled a list of facts about being intersex that will hopefully serve to create a better understanding of the subject.

  1. What exactly does intersex mean?

The trouble with that question is that being intersex has several aspects. In fact, the term is an umbrella for many variations of similar body types. According to IntersexDay.org, “Intersex people are born with sex characteristics that don’t meet medical and social norms for female or male bodies.” This can many any number of things, with innumerable variations of genitals and reproductive organs that don’t correlate to binary standards.

  1. Is being intersex the same as being a hermaphrodite?

No. For years, hermaphrodite was used synonymously with intersex. This lasted until the mid-20th century, but modern medicine has since begun to segregate the two from one another. By definition, a hermaphrodite is a living organism with both male and female reproductive organs. However due the complexity and presentation of intersex genitalia, including the varieties in which the reproductive organs present, the two have become medically disassociated with one another.

  1. How common is intersexuality?

According to the website for for the Intersex Society of North America, calculating these numbers can be tricky and often controversial. To let them better explain, we have provided a link to their FAQ page where the topic can be summed up in more detail, which can be found here

  1. What happens when intersex is identified at birth?

When identified at birth, many parents make the decision to take medical action to assign their child one binary gender. However, due to the the medical complexities behind intersexuality, a child who is assigned a binary gender at birth may not grow up to identify with the gender they were assigned. Intersex pertains not only to the presentation of the person’s genitalia, but also to the hormones the body produces and the functions of the body—which often are neither male nor female, but instead sometimes somewhere in between. One intersex person—who identifies as female—said in an interview with Cosmo that while she identifies with female and presents with fully-functional female reproductive organs, her body does not produce natural estrogen. This is just one of many ways that intersex can present itself in the human body.

  1. How do intersex people identify in terms of sexual orientation?

Just like with all other people, gender and sexuality are mutually exclusive of one another and are fluid. Intersex people are just people! They’re sexually active and enjoy dating just like all other people. Just like all the other important members of the LGBTQIA spectrum, it’s important to recognize that no matter with which gender or orientation intersex people identify, they were born who they are.

It’s time for people on and off the LGBTQIA spectrum to start being more cognizant of intersex people and to be more inclusive of them. A great starting point is with Intersex Awareness Day, and Intersex Day of Solidarity on November 8th. Ignorance on the matter only leads to exclusivity, and just like all other people—straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer, trans, cis, and asexual—intersex people should be recognized and celebrated.

After all, they’re only human. They just want to be treated as such and seen by the rest of the world.

So, today, celebrate an intersex person in your life. If you don’t know anyone who is intersex, celebrate the entire intersex community. Show your support and lift them up. Explain to someone who doesn’t know what it means to be intersex. Spread awareness so that intersex people don’t continue to be swept under the rug.

For more information on intersex awareness, visit IntersexDayProject.org or ISNA.org.