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Montrose Area Bartender Slams HERO On Social Media

With the ugly war of words, lies, and false truths over Houston Equal Rights Ordinance far from over; social media is heating up with a  slew of opinions on ‘The Great Bathroom Panic of 2015.’

“Sometime people only vote because they are part of a “label” and what they’re voting for has the same “label” ….I’m gay let me vote for Prop 1″

One opinion causing a roar comes from a Montrose bartender that works in the LGBT community. “Sometime people only vote because they are part of a “label” and what they’re voting for has the same “label” states Kashmir Cortave, a bartender at Blur Nightclub. “I’m black, let me vote for Obama. I’m gay let me vote for Prop 1.”

With what sounds like television and radio ads for HERO opponents; Cortege turns her post into an debate about protecting women and girls from sexual predators. She claims she is a mother, and men in women’s restrooms is not acceptable. “You mean to tell me a sex offender can put on a wig and a dress and go into the women’s restroom?” She writes. “No Sir!! Wtf!!”12208334_10153346832446775_3460057633631282936_n Montrose Area Bartender Slams HERO On Social Media

The ordinance nicked named HERO is similar to what 200 other cities have implemented relating to bias in housing, employment, city contracting and business services for 15 protected classes, including race, age, sexual orientation and gender identity.

Cortege’s Facebook rant pulled the scab on a ‘fresh wound’ of the LGBT community. If her intent was to engage. Her mission was accomplished.

“Men in Women’s Restrooms, there was so much more to Prop 1 and you allowed yourself become bamboozled out of satire and fear from what was completely far from the truth.” Joey Mireles, a local DJ wrote on his Facebook, linking to Cortege’s post.

“Despite our friendship for such a long time. I’m sorry, but your responses were pitiful, and although your entitled to your opinion. As a bartender in the Gay Community you should be completely more knowledgable than this.” Mireles writes.

Cortege does explain she knows people who live everyday as a women, and should be allowed to use the proper restroom. But then follows up with a question; who will regulate who’s allowed. Is that the real question?

BREAKING: South Beach Temporarily Closing for Remodeling

About-Magazine-South-Beach-Houston-Closing-2018

Popular LGBTQ Houston Dance Club in Montrose Has Closed For Remodel According To Bar Owner!

(HOUSTON) — Longtime night club in Houston has closed its doors to the public effective today. South Beach—located at 810 Pacific St.originally opened in 2001 has not undergone any major renovations in the past. According to owner Charles Armstrong, the closing is temporarily for remodeling.

A notice was released from establishment management late Thursday evening informing the club’s performers its regularly-scheduled Thursday night show, So You Think You Can Drag, hosted by Kofi, (along with all other South Beach events) would be canceled until further notice while the club undergoes reconstruction.

About Magazine + About News reached out to bar management for a statement. Charles Armstrong, owner South Beach, and its neighbor, JR’s, released a statement to About Magazine:

“South beach is closed for remodeling. Sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused. Please join the party next door at Houston’s most popular gay bar, JR’s.”

A similar statement was released via South Beach’s Facebook page.

While there’s no word yet on what the remodeling will entail or when the club will resume business, but more information will be released when made available.

Steve Grand “All American Boy” Gets Houston Ready

Steve Grand “All American Boy” Gets Houston Ready

(Houston, Texas) Steve Grand caught the attention of the world when his music video for the country-inspired “All-American Boy” hit viral gold in 2013. The song became a smash, viral hit, thanks in part to the self-produced and self-financed video, which went from zero to a million views on YouTube in a matter of days, all without the help of a label, a manager, or an agent.

The imagery was pure Americana—campfires, American flags, country roads, whiskey, and hunky, shirtless men. But there was a twist. The song and video (now with close to 4 million views and counting) both depict a situation familiar to many people—an unrequited crush of someone out of reach, that burning desire for someone you can never have.

It’s a universal truth, but Steve’s story was even more affecting, because he was telling that story from the perspective of a gay man who had a crush on a straight man. It’s not something that has ever been depicted in music quite so overtly.  Grand gained views and fans overnight and after it was discovered that he had previously been an aspiring model with sexy underwear shots in his portfolio it only propelled his career.

Grand later mounted a hugely successful Kickstarter campaign to fund his first album, All American Boy. It was the third most-funded music project ever in Kickstarter history, bringing in $327,000. While it’s become more common for celebrities to come out casually, without the fanfare or announcements on covers of magazines, Steve says it’s just as important as ever.

“While people say this is no big deal anymore, who cares? You know who cares? The kids who are still really struggling with this. The kids who feel like they would still rather be dead than live life as a gay person.”

“I’m thinking about them all the time when I’m doing these things because deep down we all just want to be loved, we want to experience love, we want to give love, we want to take in love, and we want to feel valued and understood.” He knew that gambit for “All American Boy” would work: no one had ever seen or heard anything quite like it before.

“What made the story impactful was the  apparent dichotomy  of a same-sex love story set against a very Americana backdrop—old cars, whiskey, American flags, and friends by a campfire.”

The weekend of October 2, Grand will come to Houston to perform live as part of the Diana Foundation’s Country Dinner Weekend. Recognized as the oldest continuously active gay organization in the United States, the Dianas were founded in 1953 with the mission of raising and distributing funds to organizations serving the gay community.

Event Page on Facebook.

Queer Artist ‘The Hound’ Releases New Video Starring Adult Film Star Adam Ramzi

Queer Artist 'The Hound' Releases New Video Starring Adult Film Star Adam Ramzi

Queer Artist ‘The Hound’ Releases New Video Starring Adult Film Star Adam Ramzi

(HOUSTON) – Queer Artist ‘The Hound‘ has released a new single, “Can’t Let You Go,”  and stars adult film-fox Adam Ramzi as the no-good ex The Hound can’t break free from.

The Hound tells About Magazine he drew inspiration from Alanis Morissette’s “Your House”.

“I wanted the viewer to think that they were watching me moving around my apartment, burdened by memories.  Suddenly, they realize that it’s not my place, that I’ve broken into the home of my ex who is now with someone else.”

Co-directed by The Hound and Adrian Anchondo, the music video features choreography by Andrew Pearson and some incredible dance moves by Ramzi.   It also has the distinction of being banned from Instagram for being “too sexually explicit”.

“Adam brings the relationship to life in the video,” continues The Hound.  “There were a few scenes that we kept doing over and over again and it got so very real. I could tell we were both channeling some true life experiences.”

The-Fox-and-The-Hound-2-300x169 Queer Artist 'The Hound' Releases New Video Starring Adult Film Star Adam Ramzi

The Hound knows about the dangers of a toxic love.  He admits to being in a low place in life when writing, “Can’t Let You Go.”   “I didn’t know what I wanted anymore.  I was very depressed and found myself in an incredibly toxic relationship with someone who suffered extreme highs and lows, and I was coming to terms with the fact that just because it’s love, doesn’t make it right. People also love heroin and meth, and he was definitely like a drug to me.  It took everything falling apart for me to finally walk away.”

One of the lyrics that resonates with him most is:

I could see the end,
but it was easier to pretend,
that we’d make it out alive and I wouldn’t lose a friend.

“There’s this awareness that the relationship would eventually fall apart, but until it did, things could be swept under the rug,” he explains.

The Hound grew up in Santa Clarita, a suburb outside of Los Angeles.  Music was an escape from his parent’s divorce and his dad’s alcoholism.

He came out 14, when, as a freshman at Los Angeles County High School of the Arts, he caught the eye of a popular senior.  “It was the second week of school and I heard this very cute and talented guy liked me,” he remembers.  “I wasn’t out, but that changed very quickly.”

He’d go on to date other boys in high school, including Lawrence Alarcon, his eventual bandmate. After graduation, they formed Orchid and Hound in San Francisco and began performing and releasing records.  When they broke up, The Hound kept his name.

“My songs are about my life and the lessons I’ve learned,” he explains.  “Being human means making mistakes; hearing that voice of reason and consciously choosing to ignore it.

“One thing I have learned is that relationships define us and we struggle with who we are without them. The worst ones can be impossible to let go of.”

The Hounds’ “Can’t Let You Go” is available on iTunes, Spotify and all digital platforms.  The music video is available on Youtube.

Visit his website or follow him on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.