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Teen Sex Offender Arrested For Assault Of Teen He Met At LGBT Event

An undocumented Hispanic male whom is a registered sex offender has been arrested in Austin for allegedly sexually assaulting a teen victim he met at “Out Youth.”

 

Jose Medrano, a 24-year-old sex offender has been arrested and charged sexually assaulting a boy who was less than 17-years-old at the time of the incident. According to court documents the incident occurred 2 years ago, when the victim was 15.

Officers were responding to a call about a sex crime in November 2015 when the victim came forward to tell police he had been in a consensual relationship with Medrano in which they had multiple sexual encounters for about two years. The relationship ended two years ago, the teen victim told authorities.

The two met at Out Youth, a Austin program for LGBT teens, and Medrano became his “mentor,” the teen told police.

Out Youth is an organization that “serves the Central Texas LGBTQ+ youth and their allies with programs and services to ensure these promising young people develop into happy, healthy, successful adults.”

Not on parole or probation Medrano who goes by the nickname “Bam-Bam” is reregistered on the state of Texassex offender list.

“Out Youth does not have a mentor program,” stated Aubrey Wilkerson, the organization’s director. “Medrano was never an employee or volunteer and none of the incidents described in Medrano’s arrest affidavit happened on Out Youth property.”

Austin police officers arrested Medrano on Monday, according to Travis County jail records. A bond of $50,000 has been set for the charge of Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child. An ICE Detainer has been placed on Medrano, jail records revealed.

Transgender Woman Found Murdered In Austin

AUSTIN, Texas — Austin’s LGBT+ community is mourning the tragic murder of a transgender woman found shot to death on her front door steps on January 22. It’s the city’s first murder of 2016, and the nations first murder of a Transgender woman for 2016.

The victim has been identified as Monica Loera. Austin Police Department are identifying the victim as a man.

rowell-256x300 Transgender Woman Found Murdered In AustinAccording to the police report, the victims roommate told police that Rowell “kept knocking on the door and Loera said ‘he was going to get rid of him because he didn’t want to mess with him.’ When the victim went to open the door, the roommate said he heard a sound like a firecracker and Loera said, ‘he shot me.’”

After the shooting, Loera was taken to the University Medical Center Brackenridge hospital “where she was pronounced dead from her injuries and the Travis County Medical Examiner ruled Loera’s death a homicide

Austin Police has arrested Jon Casey William Rowell in connection with her death.

Rowell is facing a charge of first-degree murder. His bond is set at $250,000.

Edward Sanchez Named One Of Houston’s Most Eligible Bachelors

Make up artist Edward Sanchez poses for a portrait at Salon Ceron in Uptown Park on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2008, in Houston. ( Sharon Steinmann / Chronicle )

Mr. Edward Sanchez  was named of Houston’s most eligible bachelors by ABC 13 last week. Who is he? He’s the man behind Edward Sanchez Cosmetics. Celebrity mastermind to the stars, he specializes in hair and makeup for photography, celebrities and film.

Age: 45
Height:5’9″
Zodiac sign:Aquarius

Edward Sanchez studied biochemistry at Georgetown University 021216-ktrk-Edward-Sanchez-img-225x300 Edward Sanchez Named One Of Houston's Most Eligible Bachelorsand continued his education at the University of Texas Pan American where he majored in nursing. However, his true passion is helping people look and feel beautiful, which inspired him to earn his Texas cosmetology license. Edward specializes in hair and makeup for photography, celebrities and film. He recently launched his own organic makeup line.

1. Ideal mate: Someone who is witty with a great knowledge of food and wine. My ideal mate would also love to explore.
2. What would constitute a perfect day for you? A great breakfast and a fun fulfilling day at work. I would end my perfect day with a great glass of wine and my ideal mate.
3. Weekend hangout spot: I love to visit international stores such as H Mart and Hong Kong Market.
4. If you were able to live to the age of 90 and retain either the mind or body of a 30-year old for the last 60 years of your life, which would you choose? After recently undergoing a total double hip replacement and the pain that led up to it, I would say retain the body of a 30 year old.
5. Where’s your happy place? In my heart…

Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American Cemetery

By  | Montrose Management District

For decades, Houstonians driving down West Dallas Street between Dunlavy and South Shepherd might have noticed an overgrown, apparently vacant lot on the south side of the street. Neglected by an absentee owner, the 5.5-acre site had become a weed-choked dumping ground, and probably seemed like a prime candidate for development. Few passing motorists would have guessed that beneath the trash and the dense underbrush was one of Houston’s most historically significant burial places.

Founded in 1896, the College Park Cemetery is one of Houston’s three remaining Jim Crow-era African-American cemeteries. (The other two are Olivewood, founded in the 1870s, and Evergreen, established in 1900.) It’s the final resting place of around 4,400 black Houstonians, including Reverend John Henry (Jack) Yates, arguably the single most important black leader in post-Civil War Houston, and the namesake of Jack Yates High School.

As fate would have it, Robert O. Robertson, the man who has spent the past 20 years leading the campaign to restore and beautify College Park, has a personal connection to Yates. Robertson is the pastor of Houston’s Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, which was founded by Yates in 1891 in historic Freedman’s Town (now the Fourth Ward). In the late 1990s Robertson was running a community service program for teenagers on probation. His office was on West Dallas, right across from an overgrown lot, so he decided to put his young charges to work cleaning up the property.

MMD_CMPCementery-21-300x199 Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American CemeteryWhen the teenagers began hacking through the weeds, they noticed a tombstone. Then another one. And another one. “When I came across the marker that said Reverend Jack Yates, I got a chill up my spine,” Robertson remembered. “I knew God had led me to that site.” Robertson began taking his probationers to the cemetery every weekend to clear brush and trash, and he started researching the cemetery’s history.

He learned that the cemetery was named for its location across from the Houston Central College for Negroes, Houston’s first black school of higher education. He also learned that interred within its grounds was the president of that college, I. M. Terrell, who went on to serve as president of Prairie View State Normal and Industrial College (now Prairie View A&M) and administrator of the Houston Negro Hospital. Also buried on the grounds is a black Texas state legislator from the Reconstruction era—one of the last black legislators, it would turn out, until Barbara Jordan in the 1960s.

Not long after he began his cleanup efforts, Robertson had to fend off an attempt by developers to deconsecrate and sell a portion of the cemetery. With help from the city of Houston, Bethel purchased the land from its owner in 1998 and later established the College Park Cemetery Association, a non-profit organization that raises money to restore and maintain the property. Thanks to the church’s efforts, in 2002 the cemetery was designated a Texas State Historical Cemetery, which guarantees it can’t be torn down.

MMD_CMPCementery-4-300x199 Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American CemeteryToday, the cemetery looks nothing like the trash-strewn lot it used to be. There’s a handsome iron fence dividing it from the street and a shell-paved road winding through the grounds; most of the overturned tombstones have been set upright, and several historical markers provide information about the cemetery. More remains to be done—the cemetery needs a new drainage system, the grounds need to be mowed twice a month, and there are plans for a small prayer garden. The association is also trying to build an endowment to ensure the cemetery is cared for in perpetuity.

More than anything else, Rev. Robertson said he wants Houston to begin giving the cemetery its proper respect. “February is Black History Month, and everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon, but we don’t pay attention to the place where these people are buried,” he said. “We say we honor Jack Yates, but we don’t honor his burial place. Martin Luther King has a beautiful place in Atlanta where he’s buried. But there were civil rights leaders before him—why not Jack Yates?”

College Park Cemetery, 3525 West Dallas Street

Tax-deductible donations to the College Park Cemetery Association can be made at collegeparkcemetery.net or mailed to College Park Cemetery Association, P.O. Box 130037, Houston, Texas 77219