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“Crazy Rich Asians” Prize Pack Sweepstakes Giveaway

Crazy Rich Asians Giveaway Sweepstakes Film John M. Chu

Enter for a chance to win a Crazy Rich Asians Prize Pack! The only thing crazier than love is family!

(NEW YORK) – Jon M. Chu (“Now You See Me 2”) directed Warner Bros. Pictures’ and SK Global Entertainment’s contemporary romantic comedy “Crazy Rich Asians,” based on the acclaimed worldwide bestseller by Kevin Kwan.

Five lucky winners will receive a “CRAZY RICH ASIANS” prize pack including a t-shirt and fan.

To enter, all you have to do is tell us in the comments which you think is crazier: love or family? Feel free to tell us why.

Txtd_Dom_Main_1sht_CZYRA "Crazy Rich Asians" Prize Pack Sweepstakes GiveawayThe film features an international cast of stars, led by Constance Wu (Fresh Off the Boat); Henry Golding, making his feature film debut; Gemma Chan (Humans); Lisa Lu (2012); and Awkwafina (Ocean’s 8, Neighbors 2); with Ken Jeong (the Hangover films) and Michelle Yeoh (Star Trek: Discovery, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon). The large starring ensemble also includes Sonoya Mizuno (La La Land), Chris Pang (Marco Polo), Jimmy O. Yang (Silicon Valley), comedian Ronny Chieng (The Daily Show), Remi Hii (Marco Polo), Nico Santos (Superstore) and Jing Lusi (Stan Lee’s Lucky Man).

Color Force’s Nina Jacobson (The Hunger Games films) and Brad Simpson (World War Z), and Ivanhoe’s John Penotti (Hell or High Water) produced the film, with Tim Coddington, Robert Friedland, Sidney Kimmel and Kevin Kwan serving as executive producers. The screenplay is by Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim, based on the novel by Kwan.

Crazy Rich Asians follows native New Yorker Rachel Chu (Wu) as she accompanies her longtime boyfriend, Nick Young (Golding), to his best friend’s wedding in Singapore. Excited about visiting Asia for the first time but nervous about meeting Nick’s family, Rachel is unprepared to learn that Nick has neglected to mention a few key details about his life. It turns out that he is not only the scion of one of the country’s wealthiest families but also one of its most sought-after bachelors. Being on Nick’s arm puts a target on Rachel’s back, with jealous socialites and, worse, Nick’s own disapproving mother (Yeoh) taking aim. And it soon becomes clear that while money can’t buy love, it can definitely complicate things.

The behind-the-scenes team included director of photography Vanja Cernjul (Marco Polo), production designer Nelson Coates (Fifty Shades Darker), costume designer Mary Vogt (Kong: Skull Island) and editor Myron Kerstein (Going in Style).

Crazy Rich Asians was filmed entirely on location in Singapore and Malaysia.

The film is set for release on August 15, 2018.

Warner Bros. Pictures presents, in association with SK Global Entertainment, a Color Force/Ivanhoe Pictures/Chu Studios Production, “Crazy Rich Asians.” It will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Entertainment Company. This film is rated PG-13.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. The Sweepstakes is sponsored by About Magazine (“Sponsor”). Sweepstakes open to U.S. residents & D.C. only 18 & older. Sweepstakes begins: 12AM EST 9 August 2018 and ends 12AM EST on 18 August 2018. Prize ARV: $25. Odds of winning based on total number of eligible entries received.

Check out the official “CRAZY RICH ASIANS” movie site.

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RELEASE AND INDEMNIFICATION:

BY ENTERING THE SWEEPSTAKES, ENTRANTS RELEASE AND HOLD HARMLESS SPONSOR, WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC (“WBEI”). AND EACH OF ITS PARENTS, DIVISIONS, AFFILIATES, SUBSIDIARIES, AGENTS AND ADVERTISING AGENCIES (COLLECTIVELY, “RELEASED PARTIES”) FROM AND AGAINST ANY AND ALL LOSSES, DAMAGES, RIGHTS, CLAIMS, AND ACTIONS OF ANY KIND ARISING IN WHOLE OR IN PART, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, FROM THE SWEEPSTAKES OR PARTICIPATION IN ANY SWEEPSTAKES-RELATED ACTIVITY (INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION THE REMOVAL FROM THE SITE OF, OR DISCONTINUATION OF ACCESS TO, ANY MATERIALS), OR RESULTING DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, FROM ACCEPTANCE, POSSESSION, USE, OR MISUSE OF ANY PRIZE AWARDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE SWEEPSTAKES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION PERSONAL INJURY, DEATH, AND/OR PROPERTY DAMAGE, AS WELL AS CLAIMS BASED ON PUBLICITY RIGHTS, DEFAMATION, AND/OR INVASION OF PRIVACY.

LIMITATION OF LIABILITY:

IN NO EVENT WILL WBEI BE RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES OR LOSSES OF ANY KIND, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES, ARISING OUT OF ANY ACCESS TO AND/OR USE OF THE SWEEPSTAKES SITEOR THE ACCEPTANCE, POSSESSION, USE, OR MISUSE OF, , OR PARTICIPATION IN, ANY PRIZE AWARDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE SWEEPSTAKES.  WITHOUT LIMITING THE FOREGOING, THE SWEEPSTAKES, ALL PRIZES, AND ALL MATERIALS PROVIDED ON OR THROUGH THE SITE ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND NON-INFRINGEMENT.

Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc and its parent, affiliates, and subsidiaries are not responsible for the promotion, administration or execution of this Sweepstakes.

Film Review: Yen Tan’s “1985”

Yen Tan’s 1985 is a quiet, well-written, and fabulously performed picture that quietly blows a kiss toward a generation of LGBTQ fighters.

Last Monday, LGBTQ film nonprofit, QFest, and queer Houston magazine, Spectrum South, presented the final night of QFest’s annual queer film festival at Rice University’s Rice Cinema, screening the new film, 1985. Starring Corey Michael Smith of Gotham fame, 1985 was written and directed by filmmaker Yen Tan and is set in the titular year surrounding the loss of life to the HIV/AIDS crisis.

QFest-Header Film Review: Yen Tan's "1985"The film sported a wonderful screenplay, and found a way to depict HIV/AIDS in the ’80s in a way that will not only make a person’s eyes well up with tears, but plays on the idiosyncrasies that help LGBTQ people laugh throughout tragedy without playing on stereotypes and cliches. The film revels in the fact that the LGBTQ community has come a long way since the earliest days of the HIV/AIDS virus, but still has a long way to go when dealing it is perceived by those on the outside. This film was a real tear jerker through its entire length. Smith plays Adrian, a man who makes viewers feel for all people who are dealing and suffering from this, past and present. His emotional scenes of tearful breakdowns are just as moving and convincing as his off-the-cuff one-liners to his childhood friend, Carly (played by the incomparable Jamie Chung), and his little brother, Andrew (played by young actor Aidan Langford).

vmadsen Film Review: Yen Tan's "1985"
Virginia Madsen, who stars as Eileen

The film’s supporting cast, however, receives equal acclaim to that of its star billing. Witches of East End and Designated Survivor star, Virginia Madsen, stars as Adrian’s mother, Eileen, who — in spite of her seemingly conservative ways — continually drops nuggets of affection for her son to let him know of her open-mindedness and liberalism (even revealing she voted for Mondale over Reagan in the 1985 election). Though often subdued and timid — likely a product of her role as a housewife during the time — Madsen’s performs brims with the honest love of a mother looking to connect with her child on a level transcendent of sexual orientation. Even Michael Chiklis’s performance (the The Shield star who portrays Adrian’s male fragility-epitomizing father) cracks the egg shell of 1980s homophobia and ignorance by letting his son know — near tearfully — that he can always count on his father for anything, even after learning Adrian’s seemingly well-kept secret. The film would also be nothing without the aforementioned Chung, who breathes something unexpected into this story that viewers might not go in expecting from a film about a gay white male — the power of feminism and liberation for women of color. Chung’s Carly is an old girlfriend and longtime friend of Adrian’s who is doing her best to grapple with why he can’t love her. But upon understanding the truth, the character wastes no time in carrying the Adrian on her shoulders, putting aside her own insecurities and hurt feelings for the man dealing with his impending death. That role — however small in the scope of the story as a whole — could not have been played by an actress other than Chung. As she jokes about her Korean upbringing while doing stand-up, she exerts the sort of strength that comes only from years of torment and inner-demons not easily translated to an authentic seeming character.

langford Film Review: Yen Tan's "1985"
Aidan Langford, who plays Andrew in the film.

But the real star of this film is reserved for none of the adults. Instead, the unsung hero of Adrian’s story and of the film as a production, is young actor Aidan Langford, whose character also is struggling with his identity and possibly his sexuality. No lines are delivered in this film with more conviction or honesty than those of Langford, nor are the scenes that really bear the soul to its audience. Langford’s childlike innocence, coupled with his innocuous upset with his brother he feels abandoned by are just as heart-wrenching as scenes dealing with the greater issues of HIV/AIDS. In fact, the part of the film that touched my heart most was when Aidan left his brother Andrew a recorded message on an eight-track because he knew that his brother one day would may go through the very same scrutiny of being judged because of his sexual orientation. And while the performances of all the actors in this montage are powerful, none are quite as visceral or real as Langford’s.

LGBTQ people have had many challenges, but still have so many more ahead such as the perception of AIDS to straight and cisgender people, equal rights, and fighting back the stereotypes of gender norms. I give this movie four stars and would recommend all to see this film. This film makes you think twice about how you treat people, simply because tomorrow is not something that is promised.

Were-About-It-1 Film Review: Yen Tan's "1985"

Editor’s Note: Spectrum South & QFest

Last night (Monday, 30 July 2018) QFest held its annual queer film festival’s closing night presented by another queer Houston magazine, Spectrum South. And I have some thoughts.

Dear Readers,

I’m not going to lie to you. Until I was editor of this magazine, I wasn’t that highly involved in the LGBTQIA community here in Houston. Sure, I served as the volunteer chair for Pride Houston, Inc. for a year and a half before. But even then I wasn’t going out to support community events very often, because most of my time was absorbed with work and school and running my committee for Pride. Besides, the way I saw it, working in such a large capacity for the fourth largest LGBTQ Pride parade and festival in the country seemed like I was doing more than my part. But over the last nine months that I’ve served in my capacity as editor-in-chief of About, I’ve learned that just working for organizations in the community isn’t quite enough to make effective change. In order to really make a difference, to really see our community thrive and succeed, to really normalize LGBTQIA people in our community, we have to work not only behind the scenes and in the stage’s spotlight. We have to show up in the audience to cheer on other queer people, their businesses, and their organizations.

Jbfzmzm Editor's Note: Spectrum South & QFest
SS creative director, Kelsey Gledhill, About editor Anthony Ramirez, SS editor Megan Smith.

That’s why it meant so much to me to get to be in the audience of the closing night of QFest this year. QFest Houston, which just closed out its 22nd annual film festival, is dedicated to the promotion of LGBTQ artists and artwork, led by artistic director Kristian Salinas, and co-artistic director, Michael Robinson. Their closing night film, a Yen Tan picture entitled 1985, told the heart-wrenching story of a young man named Adrian visiting his Ft. Worth family from Manhattan at what would likely be his last Christmas in 1985 while living with HIV/AIDS. We’ll have a full review of the film available tomorrow, but for now, just take my word (and tears) for it — it was amazing.

But even if the film hadn’t been my favorite, it told a story that many LGBTQ people of my generation need to see. I’m 24. I’m young to be doing what I do. And as someone just becoming involved in the community over the last year, I still have so much to learn about the history of our people and how close to the brink we are politically of falling into the places from which we (read: the older LGBTQ generations) have worked so hard to remove us. But films like 1985, and organizations like QFest whose mission it is to promote and share them serve as a stark reminder that when it comes to the trans people in our community, the nonbinary people in our community, the bisexuals in our community, and the people of color in our community, we still have so much work to do before we truly attain equality for all queer people. The road has gotten easier for gay men and women (especially those who are white). It’s not perfect, but it’s gotten easier, and then backslid some since around … I don’t know … November 8th, 2016? But the aforementioned members of our community who don’t have the privilege that the white gay/lesbian members do are traversing a much more difficult road. And it is our responsibility to see to it that they are getting the equal representation, support, and advocacy that we are given. Moreover, it isn’t just our responsibility to take on, but it should be our privilege to do this for them.

580860015_1280x720 Editor's Note: Spectrum South & QFest

Why? Because it’s the right thing to do. Because they’re our people, too. Because they are people, too. Because we can’t preach that love is love if we don’t show our love for everyone that it takes to make up this beautiful, variant, individualistic community.

And Salinas, Robinson, and QFest’s other staff, supporters, and fans seem to take both that responsibility and privilege quite seriously. Year-after-year, the festival brings to the screen for Houstonians films that speak to, about, and for the LGBTQIA communities of past and present. This year was no exception, and its films were powerful, poignant, and penetrative of our hearts and minds.

Following the awards ceremony (full list of winners at the end of the article) and the screening of 1985, guests were invited to join both QFest and LGBTQIA magazine Spectrum South down the hall of the Rice Cinema building for a night of entertainment courtesy of the lovely staff at Spectrum. And let me tell you … Spectrum South sure does know how to throw a helluva party. Bradley David Janacek showed up to rock the DJ booth, Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Grigio spilled into glasses, a step-and-repeat sporting Spectrum South’s logo dropped against the back of a GIF-creating photo booth, blue and purple floor lights illuminated the walls and ceilings, and a great number of supporters, sponsors, enthusiasts, and artists tiled something of a mosaic throughout the venue. Spectrum South (with the help of their sponsors Bradley David Entertainment, Morena Roas Da Artist, the Catastrophic Theatre, Stages Repertory Theatre, Mystiq, the Orchard Films, Pearl Bar Houston, and the Houston Film Commission) brought the five-day film festival to a climactic end and brought together people from all over our community.

I’d be remiss, however, if I were to pigeonhole Spectrum South to just being incredible party planners, because what they did was so much more than that.

4Hb8DMv Editor's Note: Spectrum South & QFestBy partnering with QFest, Spectrum South opened the door and laid out a welcome mat for young LGBTQIA people to enter into the world of queer film culture. In its 22 years serving the community of queer artists and supporters, QFest’s biggest supporters are of the generation of the time from whence it began. And while that generation is just as important in the normalization of queer people — more so, maybe, considering that they were the ones who fought for our rights, who rioted at Stonewall, who marched in Pride marches before they were parades and when the world wasn’t accepting of us — its up to the new generation to make sure that this legacy continues on throughout our lives and those to follow. And we can’t carry it to the next generation if we don’t participate in it ourselves. It’s easy to shrug off politics and say that everything is corrupt or that our votes don’t make a difference. Apathy is always easier. But the easy road isn’t always the best road to travel. It’s a shorter road, true; but it’s a road that ends in a bleak, lifeless field of disparity for queer people. Our crops can’t grow there if we, the people, are not watering and tending to them. And while we have many amazing cis and straight allies, we cannot rely solely on them to make the difference to better our future.

RHoP5qi Editor's Note: Spectrum South & QFest
Spectrum South’s Barrett White and Dani Benoit

Spectrum South does not take this responsibility lightly. Its co-founders (editor-in-chief Megan Smith and creative director Kelsey Gledhill) put on a sort of proverbial armor every day to bring to the Southern queer people groundbreaking information, thoughtful opinion pieces, lovely community and individual spotlights, and a monumental effort (and a successful one, if I do say so myself) to homogenize queer people into the ranks of straight, white, cis people (read: men). They humbly state that their mission and vision are “to bring visibility to the diverse and resilient individuals, groups, and personalities of the ever-growing queer South,” but I for one think that Spectrum South‘s leading ladies and extraordinary staff aren’t giving themselves the credit they deserve. They aren’t just bringing our visibility to the eyes of straight, white, cis people; and they aren’t just normalizing queer people of all kind to straight, white, cis people; they’re teaching all people (gay, straight, trans, white, black, and/or otherwise) that queer people are making contributions to this world that have gone for too long unrecognized and unappreciated without standing on a soap box or shouting to be heard over the masses.

And that’s the magic of Spectrum South. Any other magazine or newspaper or media outlet of any kind might not show up to support OutSmart, and the Montrose Star, and even our very own About Magazine — businesses that many might view to be their competitors. But you know who would?

Spectrum South.

Captaining their ship are two queer women who have worked in the journalistic market (and beyond) and who have faced hardships and adversities of their own. Yet, here they are, over a year after opening their doors, still kicking ass and celebrating our people. They aren’t just breaking the glass ceiling, they’re sweeping up the floor beneath it and making sure that no shards are left behind to gash the women and queer people who follow in their footsteps. Because at the end of the day, their vision isn’t one of self-importance or making truckloads of money or even just having the chance to write and do what they love.

3EdDARA Editor's Note: Spectrum South & QFest
Artist Morena Roas & About Media television host, Mel Rose

Their vision is that of a beautiful, adversity- and homo/transphobic-free future in which people are just people, but where queer people match cis/straight people in renown. And here at About Magazine, that’s our vision for the future, too. And that’s why it is so easy for us to also show up and support them, to share their work, and to cheer them on. More importantly, that’s why it is so easy for us at About to be inspired to do more, to do better, and to help them and all queer people and businesses be successful in whatever way we can.

As long as their are organizations like QFest and companies like Spectrum South, the queer community in the South (and all around the world) can only get better. But they can only make things better if the community shows up. To learn. To support. To fight.

QFest 2018 was a massive success; and we are so humbled by the opportunity to be there, and so excited that our friends at Spectrum South saw the importance of the organization and took the initiative to do something to increase its visibility so that our generation and the generations to follow will still be able to experience and create the kind of beautiful art that QFest provides to Houston’s LGBTQIA community.

Congratulations, QFest and Spectrum South. I speak for everyone at About Magazine and our subsidiaries when I say that we are so proud of the work you’re doing and that we will always support your endeavors.

Best,

Anthony Ramirez, Editor-in-Chief


2018 QFest Winner’s List

  • Audience Award: Señorita Maria, la Falda de la Montaña (directed & written by Rubén Mendoza)
  • Houston Film Critics Society Award: Dear Fredy (directed & written by Rubi Gat)
  • Fundamental Jury Prize for Best Screenplay: Kill the Monsters (directed & written by Ryan Lonegran)
  • Reinventing Marvin Jury Prize for Best Dramatic Performance or Most Inspiring Living Subject of a Documentary: Señorita Maria, la Falda de la Montaña (starring Maria Luisa Fuentes)
  • Special Jury Prize for Best Cinematography: He Loves Me (directed & written by Konstantinos Menelaou with cinematography by Kostis Fokas)
  • Grand Jury Prize: Dear Fredy (directed by Rubi Gat)
  • Freedom of Vision Award: Air (directed by Anatol Schuster & written by Schuster & Britta Schwem)

Film Review: Equalizer 2

equalizer 2 denzel washington movie

A short review of Equalizer 2 starring Denzel Washington from About Magazine film reviewer, Kitty Curtis.

The Equalizer 2 – released July 20th 2018 and directed by Antoine Fuqua – was action packed from start to finish. In the sequel to its 2014 predecessor – protagonist Robert McCall (played by Denzel Washington) isn’t the only ass-kicker, but is joined by an equally ass-kicking cast of supporting players. The film follows McCall following the death of his longtime friend and colleague, Susan Plummer, (Melissa Leo, who returns from the original film), but she doesn’t doesn’t go down without a fight. But the two young men who take her life have bitten off more than they can chew and come to find that they may next time think twice before killing an older woman as McCall makes it his mission to exact his revenge and avenging her death. In doing so, McCall takes on a team of killers who will stop at nothing to see him dead.

This movie has so far grossed over $70.3 million, but only took $55 million to make.The dramatic performances from the actors are spot-on and the story is tightly wound.  If you love action and sitting-on-the-edge-of-your-seat kind of movies, then this is a must-see. I give it five stars. We’re all About it.

All-About-It Film Review: Equalizer 2