Galveston | Beaumont

Home Galveston | Beaumont
Award-Winning News Coverage For Galveston & Beaumont From About Magazine.

Intersex Awareness Day 2017

Intersex Awareness Day 2017
A graphic created by Anthony Ramirez for Intersex Awareness Day 2017.

Everything you need to know about what it means to be intersex on Intersex Awareness Day

(HOUSTON) — For many in the LGBTQ community, there’s a tendency to forget that the spectrum doesn’t stop at the Q. In fact, the acronym often includes a + at the end, to maintain inclusivity of all the people who aren’t abbreviated in the acronym. However it is seldom remembered that LGBTQ+ is actually LGBTQIA: lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex, and asexual.

Many of these terms have been imbedded into our memory by now. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual are the most simple to understand for people outside the community, with trans seeming new to straight, cis-gender people (it’s not new, by the way). Asexuality could be perceived as simple explain to anyone who has no grasp on the subject. But when the word ‘intersex’ is thrown around, most people (including many in the LGBTQIA community) don’t have a clear understanding of what being intersex means.

Today, October 26th is National Intersex Awareness Day. The date marks fourteen years since the Intersex Society of North America (which ceased operations last year in 2016) first commemorated of the event back in 2003. The significance of October 26th, however, comes from that very date back in 1996 when the first public demonstration of intersex awareness was made in Boston by the ISNA. Despite the dissolving of the ISNA, October 26th (as well as National Intersex Day of Solidarity on November 8th) are currently maintained and promoted by the the Intersex Day Project, headed by Morgan Carpenter and Laura Inter since 2015.

Still, the question remains for many people within and outside of the community: what exactly is it to be intersex? Many people (wrongly) associate being intersex with being trans. This is not the case. In fact, it’s completely different altogether. So, to help spread awareness and clear up these misconceptions about being intersex on Intersex Awareness Day, I’ve compiled a list of facts about being intersex that will hopefully serve to create a better understanding of the subject.

  1. What exactly does intersex mean?

The trouble with that question is that being intersex has several aspects. In fact, the term is an umbrella for many variations of similar body types. According to IntersexDay.org, “Intersex people are born with sex characteristics that don’t meet medical and social norms for female or male bodies.” This can many any number of things, with innumerable variations of genitals and reproductive organs that don’t correlate to binary standards.

  1. Is being intersex the same as being a hermaphrodite?

No. For years, hermaphrodite was used synonymously with intersex. This lasted until the mid-20th century, but modern medicine has since begun to segregate the two from one another. By definition, a hermaphrodite is a living organism with both male and female reproductive organs. However due the complexity and presentation of intersex genitalia, including the varieties in which the reproductive organs present, the two have become medically disassociated with one another.

  1. How common is intersexuality?

According to the website for for the Intersex Society of North America, calculating these numbers can be tricky and often controversial. To let them better explain, we have provided a link to their FAQ page where the topic can be summed up in more detail, which can be found here

  1. What happens when intersex is identified at birth?

When identified at birth, many parents make the decision to take medical action to assign their child one binary gender. However, due to the the medical complexities behind intersexuality, a child who is assigned a binary gender at birth may not grow up to identify with the gender they were assigned. Intersex pertains not only to the presentation of the person’s genitalia, but also to the hormones the body produces and the functions of the body—which often are neither male nor female, but instead sometimes somewhere in between. One intersex person—who identifies as female—said in an interview with Cosmo that while she identifies with female and presents with fully-functional female reproductive organs, her body does not produce natural estrogen. This is just one of many ways that intersex can present itself in the human body.

  1. How do intersex people identify in terms of sexual orientation?

Just like with all other people, gender and sexuality are mutually exclusive of one another and are fluid. Intersex people are just people! They’re sexually active and enjoy dating just like all other people. Just like all the other important members of the LGBTQIA spectrum, it’s important to recognize that no matter with which gender or orientation intersex people identify, they were born who they are.

It’s time for people on and off the LGBTQIA spectrum to start being more cognizant of intersex people and to be more inclusive of them. A great starting point is with Intersex Awareness Day, and Intersex Day of Solidarity on November 8th. Ignorance on the matter only leads to exclusivity, and just like all other people—straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer, trans, cis, and asexual—intersex people should be recognized and celebrated.

After all, they’re only human. They just want to be treated as such and seen by the rest of the world.

So, today, celebrate an intersex person in your life. If you don’t know anyone who is intersex, celebrate the entire intersex community. Show your support and lift them up. Explain to someone who doesn’t know what it means to be intersex. Spread awareness so that intersex people don’t continue to be swept under the rug.

For more information on intersex awareness, visit IntersexDayProject.org or ISNA.org.

Individual Diagnosed With Meningitis After Bunnies On The Bayou

Individual Diagnosed With Meningitis After Bunnies On The Bayou

An Individual Who Attended Easter Weekend’s Bunnies On The Bayou In Houston Has Been Diagnosed With Meningococcal Meningitis According To Health Officials!

(Houston) – An individual who attended Bunnies on the Bayou  on Easter Sunday has been diagnosed with Meningococcal Meningitis, the City of Houston’s Health Department announced late Saturday. Health officials and Bunnies on the Bayou are in the process of notifying attendees.

‘There may be unrecognized cases who were in close contact with this person,’ a e-mail released to the LGBT community from Bunnies on the Bayou explains. ‘This is an example of public health in action in order to prevent further cases.’

“The City of Houston Health Department contacted us about one person who was confirmed and treated,” Josh Beasley, board member for Bunnies on the Bayou explained to About News. BOTB is an non-profit, and one of Houston’s oldest and most prestigious organizations that raises money to help many different LGBTQ charities.

“To our knowledge, this is the first time in 40 years something like this has happened,” Beasley says.

Meningococcal meningitis is a rare but serious infection that can be fatal or cause great harm without prompt treatment. As many as one out of five people who contract the infection have serious complications.

Each year, approximately 1,000 people in the U.S. get meningococcal meningitis, which includes meningitis and septicemia (blood infection).  According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 15% of those who survive are left with disabilities that include deafnessbrain damage, and neurological problems.

“The epidemiologist said there was a lower risk of transmission in this case, but asked if we would email information out just in case,” Beasley said.

The symptoms include sudden onset fever, headache and stiff neck. Nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light, and confusion are also symptoms. Symptoms may appear quickly or over several days, typically within 3-7 days after exposure. The virus is not spread by causal contact nor is it airborne.

Officials ask if you have experienced any of the above symptoms please contact your health care provider immediately. For any questions or concerns you may also contact the Houston Health Department at 832-393-5080.

 

 

Reality TV Stars And American Gladiator Set To Walk Red Carpet At 2016 FACE Awards

Married to Medicine's Dr. Ashandra Batiste(L)and Sisters In Law's Jolonda Jones (R)
Married to Medicine's Dr. Ashandra Batiste(L)and Sisters In Law's Jolonda Jones (R)

WE TV’s ‘Sisters In Law’ Jolonda Jones, Cherrise Traylor, and Bravo’s ‘Married To Medicine’ Dr. Ashandra Batiste Set To Attend Houston’s LGBTQ+ FACE Awards To Honor The Community!

HOUSTONNOV 26 — It gets real as in ‘real’ilty this year on the red carpet for Houston’s LGBTQ+ FACE Awards as some of TV’s hottest reality stars come to Montrose for the 5th annual award show that honors the LGBTQ+ community in December presented by Avenue 360 Health & Wellness and Smirnoff Vodka. Set for Monday, December 12 in Montrose at South Beach. Red carpet arrivals at 7PM and award show at 8:30PM.silcastphoto Reality TV Stars And American Gladiator Set To Walk Red Carpet At 2016 FACE Awards

Rolling into their 5th year, the F.A.C.E. Awards swings out their fabulous red carpet in true celebrity fashion to welcome celebrity reality stars into Montrose for an evening that is promised to be the ‘VMA’s of Houston.’

Bravo’s hit TV show ‘Married to Medcine’ star Dr. Ashandra “Shan” Batiste will stroll down the magical red carpet that will be hosted by the Houston Chronicle’s Joey Guerra along with a special unnamed guest. Batiste, a Houston dental surgeon; is one of the stars of the new reality show that is currently being filmed in Houston. Batiste will also be a presenter. Bravo has long capitalized on the formula of revulsion + curiosity = good television.

2016-FACE-AWARDS-1024x256 Reality TV Stars And American Gladiator Set To Walk Red Carpet At 2016 FACE Awards

WEtv’s Network’s reality series Sisters In Law  Jolonda Jones will be in attendance. Jones is no stranger to reality television. She has appeared on the hit CBS television show Survivor multiple times. But proudly, Jones is a Houstonian, and an outspoken advocate. Currently in production of a new reality show, and a full television camera crew in tow, Jones will grace the red carpet. Jones is currently filming a new reality show.

WEtv’s Sisters In Law star Cherrise Traylor, will be joining the crowd that is set to honor some of Houston’s best in over twenty different categories. Traylor is a nationally known personal trainer, a national football player for the Houston Energy, and an American Gladiator.

Galveston County Sheriff Refuses To Release Documents In Death Of Gay Man In Custody

Jesse Jacobs died in custody of the Galveston County Sheriff.
Jesse Jacobs died in custody of the Galveston County Sheriff.

Galveston County Sheriff Refuses To Release Documents In Death Of Gay Man In Custody

(HOUSTON, TX) – The Galveston County Sheriff is refusing to release documents, any videos and the intake form of a gay man that died while in custody at the Galveston County Jail back in March 2015 fearing a lawsuit from the family. A move that shows not all law enforcement agencies are ready to be completely transparent.

On March 6, 2015, Jesse C. Jacobs was processed into the Galveston County Jail to serve 15 days for a second DWI offense. He served about half of that, and was pronounced dead on March 14, 2015 at University of Texas – Medical Branch in Galveston after being transported from the Galveston County Jail.

Sheriff Henry Trochesset told local ABC affiliate KTRK-13 he would not release anything out of fear of litigation from the family. As protests and riots continue around the country, and in Texas over the Sandra Bland case; the Jacob’s case is being hidden from the family and the public by Galveston officials.

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is a law that gives you the right to access information from the government. It is often described as the law that keeps citizens in the know about their government.

The Jacobs family is outraged over the lack of transparency. “I’m angry,” says Jacobs’ father, also named Jesse. “Because as far as I’m concerned, they executed my son just as sure as if they put a gun to his head and pulled the trigger.” Jesse told Miya Shay of KTRK-13.

In accordance to the law, the Sheriff of Galveston County must disclose any information requested under the FOIA unless it falls under one of nine exemptions, which protect interests such as personal privacy, and national security. None of the nine exemptions would allow for the Sheriff to withhold information that should be made available to the public and family of Jacobs.

One exemption would be an on-going criminal investigation into the death of Jacobs. The Galveston County Sheriff has stated that the cause of death in the autopsy report is natural causes.

KTRK-13 asked Sheriff Trochesset if he believes everything was done by the book. “It appears that way,” he answered. Trochesset told About Magazine ‘he hasn’t worked inside the jail it self in about 30 years.’