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Firsts

Firsts Travis Crockett

They gave me a navy folder with
a packet of information twenty pages thick,
the first page titled “Day One.”
But there wasn’t a first day. A first month perhaps,
a memory salad of molding dread and sharp panic.

There was the first cut,
in public of course,
my hands fumbling a sharp piece of junk in a Good Will.
The high school clerk did not
appreciate my urgency for a Band-Aid
while blood—horror movie red
ballooned—from the tiny wound.
I bought the trash and took it home.
My first trophy.
There was the first education,
a confiding one-sided script.
People will say anything
in safe company.
He had put his
“health at risk, you know?”.
Truth shared under the assumption of a common status.
That was the first silence as well.
I was still learning how to speak; I could not yet teach.

There was the first rejection, but that only deserves one line.

There was the first doctors appointment.
The first blood draw.
The first results.
The first time they took my blood pressure
they had to take it again,
and again,
telling me I had to calm down,
that this was not
the first time someone had been in my position.
That was the first time I heard white coat syndrome.

Your new obsession becomes the first of many.
A refreshed interest in books,
things you said you would learn some other day,
or perhaps movies, foreign films,
you devour them, amass so many of these titles
you must buy a new book shelf,
you start looking at new TVs with better resolution,
you find a new couch to better hold you in these
delicate moments of escape.

I bought plants.
I bought so many,
willed my thumb turn from black to green,
surrounded myself with as much life as
I could fit on my south-facing patio.
To see the humble arc of beginning,
flourishing beautiful middle, and
graceful, lingering end, was my first recovery.
The next year I only bought five.

The first plant I bought lived
all through summer and into fall.
I buried it in wet November mud
next to a creek and
did not think of myself.


TravisCrockett-300x300 FirstsTRAVIS CROCKETT considers poetry to be a fourth alternative to Albert Camus’ options for dealing with the absurdity of life. Instead of willful denial through religion, suicide, or a total embrace of absurdity, poetry permits his desire for something greaterthan himself, acknowledges the terrors of being alive, and shakes hands with l’absurde. Travis considers poetry to be a way to wink back when the abyss get awkward and stares too long. He lives in Texas with his boyfriend and his dog.

Houston’s Crocker Bar Raises Thousands For Multiple Sclerosis

Houston’s Crocker Bar Raises Thousands For Multiple Sclerosis

Houston LGBT Club Raises Thousands In Support Of Multiple Sclerosis, Aids Services Of Houston.

(HOUSTON) — A Houston LGBT bar owner has delivered on a mighty large promise made to his customers in the community. Crocker Bar owner Grey Stephen’s vowed on social media last month to donate 50% of sales in March to benefit the two charities in the greater Houston area.

The ‘everybody-knows-your-name’ bar in the heart of Montrose was showered with support from patrons. The bar sold a total of 21,786 drinks. A statement of support from the community, as Stephens himself was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2014.

“I have Multiple Sclerosis and I cannot thank you enough for helping me in this battle,” Stephens said. “I don’t think you will ever know how much this means to me.”

Stephens and business partner Bruce Reeves’ donation of $10,893.00 will be divided among the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and Aids Services of Houston. That’s $5,446.50 for each of the two charities.

On top of the bar’s donation raised to fight MS, Reeves will be making an additional $12,000 donation that he has raised. Reeves an avid supporter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society participates each year in the MS150.

If you missed the opportunity and would like to donate you can drop off checks at Crocker Bar made out to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS).

Bunnies On The Bayou Host Annual Fundraiser This Weekend At Pearl Bar

Honey Bunnies Fundraiser Houston Pearl Bar About Magazine

Bunnies On The Bayou To Host ‘Honey Bunnies’ At Pearl Bar This Weekend With Co Sponsor Her Destination Unknown!

HOUSTONFEB 23 — Sunday Funday will get a little more festive this weekend on Washington Avenue as Bunnies on the Bayou hosts the annual ‘Honey Bunnies’ fundraiser.

Starting at 2 p.m. Bunnies on the Bayou partner Her Destination Unknown (HDU) will hold their annual ‘Charity Date Auction,’ where one very special ‘Bunny’ will be up for grabs. Attendees will also enjoy jello-shots and a chance to advance purchase tickets for the annual Easter weekend shindig.

Her Destination Unknown provides the LGBT lesbian community with a community beyond the lesbian community. What started as a core group of six women now consists of over seven hundred members.

Among their annual fundraisers is AIDS Foundation Houston and the Houston Food Bank. HDU has raised over $50,000 for these local non-profits.

Details: Honey Bunnies visit Facebook 

TRUTH Project Kicks Off ‘We Are Gold’ Annual Fundraiser In Houston

TRUTH Project Kicks Off ‘We Are Gold’ Annual Fundraiser In Houston

 

The 2nd Annual T.R.U.T.H. Project Kicks Off Annual Fundraiser In Montrose In October.

HOUSTON Oct 5 — The time for TRUTH has come to Houston. The T.R.U.T.H Project kicks off its annual fundraiser In Houston on Oct. 22, 12016 in Montrose. Entitled We Are Gold will be held at Zimm’s Martini & Wine Bar.

The T.R.U.T.H. Project (Telling Real Unapologetic Truths through Healing) is a 501c3 charitable organization that educates and mobilizes LGBTQ communities of color and their allies through social arts that promote mental, emotional and sexual health. The impact on the community is very surreal said Founder Kevin Anderson.

“It’s humbling to have the support of artists and healthcare providers who understand the vision for using the arts as a tool for healing through information, education, and access to resources,” Anderson said.

This year’s fundraiser will include a montage of video clips from previous installments and live demonstrations of spoken word, live music, and visual art to showcase how the T.R.U.T.H. Project connects art and health.

Since its inception, The T.R.U.T.H Project has reached more than 5,000 attendees and continues to grow. Performances are held quarterly and have addressed issues such as bullying, domestic violence, and depression. The Texas State Department of Health recognized the efforts of the T.R.U.T.H. Project and its founder, Kevin Anderson, to use the arts as a vehicle for information, awareness, and access to resources, and awarded a grant that allowed him to extend his outreach by partnering with national recording artist such as Marsha Ambrosius and Chisette Michele. He has also served as a consultant in other cities interested in starting similar initiatives.

For additional information visit:  www.TruthProjecthtx.org