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East Montrose To Be Developed Into Fairview District

East Montrose To Be Developed Into Fairview District

New Designs Released For New Development That Will Be Built On Site Of Old Meteor Lounge

HOUSTON Oct 13 — Updated designs have been released showing the plans for Fairview St. and Taft St. that will include Max’s Wine Dive and Cuchara. The new development will include mixed-use retail/office development that is currently available for pre-lease in the heart of Montrose, offering boutique office, restaurant and retail space, as well as a five-story parking garage. Construction is slated to begin January 2017.

According to CBRE the project will be branded the ‘Fairview District,’ due to being situated as a strategic entryway to Montrose from Midtown,– will be comprised of four buildings.

East-Montrose-To-Be-Developed-Into-Fairview-District2 East Montrose To Be Developed Into Fairview District“Office tenants today are looking for an experience. They want to be inspired in their work space and also have direct access to progressive retail and dining concepts,” CBRE’s Rima Soroka said

Featuring a highly creative design concept, which includes industrial elements such as glass, brick and steel, as well as exposed 10-foot ceilings, Fairview District will be an attractive development for office tenants who thrive in collaborative work environments, Soroka said.

“Montrose has served as the cultural hub of Houston for decades,” EDGE Realty’s Lacee Jacobs said. “Fairview District will offer a unified retail and restaurant destination with new, unique concepts that reflect the neighborhood and the city’s eclectic and diverse personality.”

East-Montrose-To-Be-Developed-Into-Fairview-District1 East Montrose To Be Developed Into Fairview District“Fairview District will offer a rare urban experience in Houston: a cultural hub where young professionals and consumers mingle day and night, at work and play,” Fred Sharifi, with SFT Investments, said. “We are excited to work with industry leading partners, such as Gensler, to emphasize the pedestrian character of the neighborhood.”

 

By Cade Michals (About News, About Magazine)

Montrose Gets New Luxury High Rise Condos And Hotel

Montrose Gets New Luxury High Rise Condos And Hotel

Montrose Area Boutique Hotels Strikes Deal With Hines Development For Luxury High Rise

HOUSTON Oct. 5 — La’Colombe d’Or owner Steve Zimmerman and Hines Development announced on Tuesday a partnership that will develop a 34-story residential high-rise, and adjoining hotel.

The development includes a $10 million dollar expansion to the boutique hotel, along with a 285-unit tower, to be named Residences at La Colombe d’Or. La Colombe d’Or boutique hotel on Montrose Boulevard. The tower will be built on Yoakum St.

“La Colombe d’Or is one of those unique Houston gems that makes our city so special,” Hines Founder and Chairman Gerald D. Hines said. “We look forward to working hand-in-hand with the Zimmerman family to be a part of the next chapter in the legacy of this celebration of enriched living.”

The family owned historic hotel was built in 1923. The landmark property serves as one of the world’s premier luxury boutique hotels in Montrose.

Construction set to start in 2017 with completion in 2020.

Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American Cemetery

By  | Montrose Management District

For decades, Houstonians driving down West Dallas Street between Dunlavy and South Shepherd might have noticed an overgrown, apparently vacant lot on the south side of the street. Neglected by an absentee owner, the 5.5-acre site had become a weed-choked dumping ground, and probably seemed like a prime candidate for development. Few passing motorists would have guessed that beneath the trash and the dense underbrush was one of Houston’s most historically significant burial places.

Founded in 1896, the College Park Cemetery is one of Houston’s three remaining Jim Crow-era African-American cemeteries. (The other two are Olivewood, founded in the 1870s, and Evergreen, established in 1900.) It’s the final resting place of around 4,400 black Houstonians, including Reverend John Henry (Jack) Yates, arguably the single most important black leader in post-Civil War Houston, and the namesake of Jack Yates High School.

As fate would have it, Robert O. Robertson, the man who has spent the past 20 years leading the campaign to restore and beautify College Park, has a personal connection to Yates. Robertson is the pastor of Houston’s Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, which was founded by Yates in 1891 in historic Freedman’s Town (now the Fourth Ward). In the late 1990s Robertson was running a community service program for teenagers on probation. His office was on West Dallas, right across from an overgrown lot, so he decided to put his young charges to work cleaning up the property.

MMD_CMPCementery-21-300x199 Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American CemeteryWhen the teenagers began hacking through the weeds, they noticed a tombstone. Then another one. And another one. “When I came across the marker that said Reverend Jack Yates, I got a chill up my spine,” Robertson remembered. “I knew God had led me to that site.” Robertson began taking his probationers to the cemetery every weekend to clear brush and trash, and he started researching the cemetery’s history.

He learned that the cemetery was named for its location across from the Houston Central College for Negroes, Houston’s first black school of higher education. He also learned that interred within its grounds was the president of that college, I. M. Terrell, who went on to serve as president of Prairie View State Normal and Industrial College (now Prairie View A&M) and administrator of the Houston Negro Hospital. Also buried on the grounds is a black Texas state legislator from the Reconstruction era—one of the last black legislators, it would turn out, until Barbara Jordan in the 1960s.

Not long after he began his cleanup efforts, Robertson had to fend off an attempt by developers to deconsecrate and sell a portion of the cemetery. With help from the city of Houston, Bethel purchased the land from its owner in 1998 and later established the College Park Cemetery Association, a non-profit organization that raises money to restore and maintain the property. Thanks to the church’s efforts, in 2002 the cemetery was designated a Texas State Historical Cemetery, which guarantees it can’t be torn down.

MMD_CMPCementery-4-300x199 Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American CemeteryToday, the cemetery looks nothing like the trash-strewn lot it used to be. There’s a handsome iron fence dividing it from the street and a shell-paved road winding through the grounds; most of the overturned tombstones have been set upright, and several historical markers provide information about the cemetery. More remains to be done—the cemetery needs a new drainage system, the grounds need to be mowed twice a month, and there are plans for a small prayer garden. The association is also trying to build an endowment to ensure the cemetery is cared for in perpetuity.

More than anything else, Rev. Robertson said he wants Houston to begin giving the cemetery its proper respect. “February is Black History Month, and everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon, but we don’t pay attention to the place where these people are buried,” he said. “We say we honor Jack Yates, but we don’t honor his burial place. Martin Luther King has a beautiful place in Atlanta where he’s buried. But there were civil rights leaders before him—why not Jack Yates?”

College Park Cemetery, 3525 West Dallas Street

Tax-deductible donations to the College Park Cemetery Association can be made at collegeparkcemetery.net or mailed to College Park Cemetery Association, P.O. Box 130037, Houston, Texas 77219

Montrose Developer Unhappy About Parking Requirements

Developer Fred Sharifi of SFT Investments is planning a $20 million, 60,000-square-foot mixed-use development for the corner of Genesee Street and Fairview—the current site of nightclub Meteor and a small apartment complex—that will include retail, office, and restaurant space, as well as six to eight loft-style apartments.

But because of the city’s onerous parking requirements, the project’s tallest structure will be a six-story parking garage.

Architect Peter Merwin told the Houston Business Journal that he will be forced to provide eight to ten parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of development. Merwin said he hopes Houston will change its approach to parking: “I think the city is starting to see that if you let engineers optimize everything for the automobile, you’re going to have a city optimized for the automobile and not the pedestrian.”

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