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Intersex Awareness Day 2017

Intersex Awareness Day 2017
A graphic created by Anthony Ramirez for Intersex Awareness Day 2017.

Everything you need to know about what it means to be intersex on Intersex Awareness Day

(HOUSTON) — For many in the LGBTQ community, there’s a tendency to forget that the spectrum doesn’t stop at the Q. In fact, the acronym often includes a + at the end, to maintain inclusivity of all the people who aren’t abbreviated in the acronym. However it is seldom remembered that LGBTQ+ is actually LGBTQIA: lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex, and asexual.

Many of these terms have been imbedded into our memory by now. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual are the most simple to understand for people outside the community, with trans seeming new to straight, cis-gender people (it’s not new, by the way). Asexuality could be perceived as simple explain to anyone who has no grasp on the subject. But when the word ‘intersex’ is thrown around, most people (including many in the LGBTQIA community) don’t have a clear understanding of what being intersex means.

Today, October 26th is National Intersex Awareness Day. The date marks fourteen years since the Intersex Society of North America (which ceased operations last year in 2016) first commemorated of the event back in 2003. The significance of October 26th, however, comes from that very date back in 1996 when the first public demonstration of intersex awareness was made in Boston by the ISNA. Despite the dissolving of the ISNA, October 26th (as well as National Intersex Day of Solidarity on November 8th) are currently maintained and promoted by the the Intersex Day Project, headed by Morgan Carpenter and Laura Inter since 2015.

Still, the question remains for many people within and outside of the community: what exactly is it to be intersex? Many people (wrongly) associate being intersex with being trans. This is not the case. In fact, it’s completely different altogether. So, to help spread awareness and clear up these misconceptions about being intersex on Intersex Awareness Day, I’ve compiled a list of facts about being intersex that will hopefully serve to create a better understanding of the subject.

  1. What exactly does intersex mean?

The trouble with that question is that being intersex has several aspects. In fact, the term is an umbrella for many variations of similar body types. According to IntersexDay.org, “Intersex people are born with sex characteristics that don’t meet medical and social norms for female or male bodies.” This can many any number of things, with innumerable variations of genitals and reproductive organs that don’t correlate to binary standards.

  1. Is being intersex the same as being a hermaphrodite?

No. For years, hermaphrodite was used synonymously with intersex. This lasted until the mid-20th century, but modern medicine has since begun to segregate the two from one another. By definition, a hermaphrodite is a living organism with both male and female reproductive organs. However due the complexity and presentation of intersex genitalia, including the varieties in which the reproductive organs present, the two have become medically disassociated with one another.

  1. How common is intersexuality?

According to the website for for the Intersex Society of North America, calculating these numbers can be tricky and often controversial. To let them better explain, we have provided a link to their FAQ page where the topic can be summed up in more detail, which can be found here

  1. What happens when intersex is identified at birth?

When identified at birth, many parents make the decision to take medical action to assign their child one binary gender. However, due to the the medical complexities behind intersexuality, a child who is assigned a binary gender at birth may not grow up to identify with the gender they were assigned. Intersex pertains not only to the presentation of the person’s genitalia, but also to the hormones the body produces and the functions of the body—which often are neither male nor female, but instead sometimes somewhere in between. One intersex person—who identifies as female—said in an interview with Cosmo that while she identifies with female and presents with fully-functional female reproductive organs, her body does not produce natural estrogen. This is just one of many ways that intersex can present itself in the human body.

  1. How do intersex people identify in terms of sexual orientation?

Just like with all other people, gender and sexuality are mutually exclusive of one another and are fluid. Intersex people are just people! They’re sexually active and enjoy dating just like all other people. Just like all the other important members of the LGBTQIA spectrum, it’s important to recognize that no matter with which gender or orientation intersex people identify, they were born who they are.

It’s time for people on and off the LGBTQIA spectrum to start being more cognizant of intersex people and to be more inclusive of them. A great starting point is with Intersex Awareness Day, and Intersex Day of Solidarity on November 8th. Ignorance on the matter only leads to exclusivity, and just like all other people—straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer, trans, cis, and asexual—intersex people should be recognized and celebrated.

After all, they’re only human. They just want to be treated as such and seen by the rest of the world.

So, today, celebrate an intersex person in your life. If you don’t know anyone who is intersex, celebrate the entire intersex community. Show your support and lift them up. Explain to someone who doesn’t know what it means to be intersex. Spread awareness so that intersex people don’t continue to be swept under the rug.

For more information on intersex awareness, visit IntersexDayProject.org or ISNA.org.

Equinox Gym Celebrates Pride Month With Short Film

Equinox Celebrates Pride Month With Short Film

Equinox Celebrates Pride Month With Short Film Adding 26 Letters To LGBTQ+

It’s Pride around the U.S. and many national companies are sharing their LOVE for the LGBTQ+ communities

(NEW YORK) In celebration of Pride month, Equinox gym has released a new short film, “LGBTQAlphabet: Six Letters Will Never Be Enough,” that expands the definition of LGBTQ into a full alphabet with 26 distinct opportunities to proudly communicate who you are and how you love.

Equinox has been a long-time supporter of the LGBTQ community and Pride around the world, but this year they wanted to make an even more powerful contribution.  They worked with NYC’s LGBT Community Center to produce the short film. Take a peak at the video above.

Interlaced into it are voices from members of The Center, who express how they identify themselves in the queer community and as citizens in the world. 26 words, from Ally to Ze | Zir are brought to life in authentic, brave and meaningful ways.

The video is a continuation of Equinox’s “Commit to Something” narrative and further explores the theme of identity specifically reflecting the diversity of the LGBTQ community.

The Search for True Love Shines On Film In “Don’t Marry Griff”

In This New Film, African American Gay Men Search for True Love Releasing Nationally

Don’t Marry Griff, the latest independent film by Color of Love Production Studios, tells the story of Lyodell Archer (Steven L. Coard) and best friend Sutton Brown (Chris DeLoatch) as their friendship is shaken to its core once Sutton confesses his love to Lyodell. Things get even more complicated because he chooses to do it as Lyodell is about to wed his fiancé, Griffith Lowell (JR Rolley).

Don’t Marry Griff is a romantic comedy about love shared between African American men,” explains director Steven L. Coard, who also stars in the film.  “I have always dreamed of the day when I could produce my own independent film for the gay African American community. I aim to create unique and original stories that will hopefully unite our community.”

Coard intends for Don’t Marry Griff to be the first of a series of movies that tackle love stories of gay African American characters.  “It’s important for African American gay men to have characters they can identify with while being entertained,” he says.

“I think most gay black men are striving to achieve the American Dream. I  know I want that white picket fence.  Although I am not looking for the children part,” he adds with a grin.

Don’t Marry Griff  stars Steven L. Coard, Chris DeLoatch and JR Rolley.

Coard had DeLoatch in mind for the role of Sutton when writing the film.  “I had seen him in the web series, ‘Bait’. He plays a psycho killer in the show but I saw a genuine goodness in him.”

The character of Sutton is the type of guy everyone dreams about being with one day.  He’s honest with a sense of humor.  He’s confident, courageous, communicative, a natural leader who listens and takes initiative.  He’s not afraid to go after what he wants and most importantly, he stands up to Griffith in the film and provides Lyodell a safe haven.

Coard originally had another actor in the role of Griffith, but as so often happens in independent filmmaking, two weeks before filming was set to begin, the actor dropped out. Coard was left scrambling to find someone to replace him.  DeLoatch recommended he consider JR Rolley, an actor known for playing  lovable guy-next-door roles.  Coard was doubtful as the role of Griffith called for a type-A, bad-ass personality.  “Despite my hesitation, I brought JR in to read for the part. I immediately saw the passion in his eyes and that he was very prepared and looking for a character opposite from the pretty boy roles he usually plays.”

All seemed to be back on track with filming, until the actor confirmed to play Lyodell unexpectedly dropped out, too.  Pressed for time, Coard decided to take on the role himself.  “I had wanted to focus on working behind the camera as executive producer and director but things don’t always work out the way you plan,” he laughs.  “I sucked it up and and called in my acting chops to start working again.”

Don’t Marry Griff is being distributed by Color of Love Production Studios, an award winning production company that specializes in creating stories about the LGBTQ community of color.   Founded by Steven L. Coard, the studio strives to  focus on unique issues of relevance to the gay African American identity.

“The wonderful thing about Don’t Marry Griff is that viewers do not need to be African American and gay to enjoy it,” says Coard.  “Anyone who has experienced a toxic relationship can relate to the film.  It entertains and is educational as well.   I won’t give away the ending but I will tell you, in Don’t Marry Griff , karma is a beeeotch.”

For more information, visit https://colorofloveproduction.com.

World-Renowned Tenor Jorge Garza Featured At 55th Annual Houston Boychoir Concert

World-Renowned Tenor Jorge Garza Featured At 55th Annual Houston Boychoir Concert

World-Renowned Tenor, Jorge Garza featured in 55th Annual Houston Boychoir Concert

(HOUSTON)– The Houston Boychoir proudly presents its 55th Spring Concert at the Moores Opera House Sunday, May 21, 2017 at 4:00 PM.

The highlight of the evening will be a piece by Ariel Ramirez called Misa Criolla.

Soloist Jorge Garza, an world-renowned tenor and Houston Boychoir Alumnus will be guest soloist for the evening. Mr. Garza most recent work includes the National Moravian-Silesian Theatre in a production of La Clemenza di Tito. Misa Criolla features traditional Andean instruments such as the charango and zampoña and percussion.

The University of Houston invites you to come and be delighted in the traditional sounds of the soaring voices of Houston Boychoir. You will have the opportunity to hear four different choirs of varying ages. In the concert the audience will enjoy Spanish music from all our choirs, Preparatory Choir, Chamber Choir, Olde Boys, and the Men of Houston Boychoir. It is going to be an inspiring afternoon of music from all of our choirs.

Tickets are $10/$7 for seniors and students.  For more information please visit www.houstonboychoir.orginfo@houstonboychoir.org or call (281)-484-1560.