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Celebrities To Attend Face Awards This Week

GRAMMY, EMMY WINNERS AND THE VOICE GEAR UP TO HONOR HOUSTON LGBT COMMUNITY AT 6TH ANNUAL FACE AWARDS THIS WEEK

HOUSTON — LGBTQ+ Houston’s biggest award show celebrates their sixth year by announcing some of the biggest names in entertainment and politics this year for the 2017 FACE Awards, hosted by Sarah PepperLauren Kelly, and Geoff Sheen, the morning show at Mix 96.5FM.  The 2017 FACE Awards to be held South Beach the Nightclub in Montrose this week on Thursday, November 16, 2017, and is presented by Avenue 360 Health & WellnessSouth Beach the Nightclub and CBS Radio Houston.

NBC’s The Voice ® contestant and star Stephanie Rice will walk the red carpet and has been announced as a presenter at the FACE Awards. Grammy® winning artist Billy Dorsey, an outspoken advocate for equality will join the long list of exciting presenters. Dorsey will also be bringing down the house, as the FACE Awards has announced he will also perform.

derrick-shore-900x600 Celebrities To Attend Face Awards This Week
Derrick Shore at Emmy Awards presented at the Television Academy’s Wolf Theatre at the Saban Media Center on Saturday, July 22, 2017

Derrick Shore, an Emmy® winning journalist with more than 15 years in TV reporting on everything from the red carpet at the Oscars® to events at the White House has been announced to attend and present. Joining the amazing list of Emmy® winning talent, ABC News Houston affiliate Jessica Willey will grace the red carpet and co-present with a special guest.

Others exciting names will include Harris County Constable Alan Rosen, the beautiful Miss Texas, Nicole Lassiter whom will be returning for her second year. As the first openly gay President of Texas A&M UniversityBobby Brooks will make his debut this year. Houston’s favorite Al Farb, of 93Q Country, has also been announced to present. This year each presenter will be teamed up with an LGBT member of the community to present awards. A move that shows unity and equality, and love.

The FACE Awards will present awards in twenty-one different categories. Joey Guerra, Music Critic of the Houston Chronicle and Joy Sewing, Fashion Editor of the Houston Chronicle return to host ‘LIVE’ from the Red Carpet, a pre-show that highlights the red carpet arrivals of nominees, past winners, and community leaders starting at 7 PM and will be broadcast live on multiple social media platforms. Award show starts promptly at 8:30 PM.

Get Social With The Team

FACE Awards Twitter | FacebookInstagram | Website

Avenue 360 Health & Wellness FacebookWebsite

CBS Radio Sarah Pepper | Lauren Kelly

South Beach The Nightclub Facebook | Website

Joey Guerra Twitter | Instagram

Pride Houston® Facebook | Website

About Magazine Announces New Chief Editor

LGBT News Platform About Magazine Names Anthony Ramirez As Editor In Cheif

LGBT News Platform About Magazine Names Anthony Ramirez As Editor In Chief

(HOUSTON) — About Magazine + About News today announced that Anthony Ramirez has been appointed editor-in-chief of the About News platform. Ramirez succeeds Cade Michals, executive publisher, and founder since 2008, who is stepping aside for Ramirez to take lead. Michals will step back from his post as executive publisher of the LGBT news platform on November 7.

Michals will continue to play a pivotal role behind the scenes with the organization, and its multiple affiliates, but will no longer make editorial, or day-to-day management decisions. Michals, also the founder and director of the LGBT award show in Houston, The F.A.C.E. Awards, has been transitioning the award show to a non-profit over the past few months allowing the awards show to continue.

Ramirez is no stranger to writing. He is credited with three published novels (The Write Thing, Witches of the Deep South, and Where He Lay Down). Credits also include published work with the Advertising Specialty Institute, and a nationally published column ‘Less Than Butterflies,’ that Ramirez has transitioned to the About News platform.

DSC_0059-1024x686 About Magazine Announces New Chief Editor
Anthony Ramirez named new editor in chief of About Magazine

Anthony has served as the editor of fiction and the director of social media and marketing for ELJ Publications. Last year he hosted the event Yas Queen: Out of the Margins (a reading of LGBTQ, POC, and women writers) at the American Writers and Writing Programs Conference in Washington D.C. He recently completed coursework for his Bachelor of the Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

Beyond writing and journalism, Ramirez is also a performer of the stage and screen. He is the host and executive producer of the web show ‘Wineding Down with Anthony.’ Ramirez currently produces and stars in the forthcoming sitcom ‘The Anthony Project.’

He also sings annually in the Kingwood Kabaret scholarship fundraising event for Lone Star College. Additionally, Ramirez serves as the volunteer committee chair for Pride Houston, Inc. His most recent novel, Where He Lay Down, was considered for an honor by the American Library Association’s ‘Over the Rainbow’ committee.

Starting with About News in June, Ramirez was an investigative reporter. With this transition, Ramirez plans to expand the brand into a multimedia platform that will include a boost in op-ed pieces, featuring short fiction and poetry from LGBTQ writers around the state. Also including video content, and spotlights on Texas-based LGBTQ civilians who impact the community in a positive way.

As a means of achieving these goals, Ramirez states he is actively seeking writers, videographers, editors, and SEO-literate people within the community to take the brand to a new level.

You can follow Ramirez on Twitter @MAnthony Ramirez or on Facebook at facebook.com/AnthonyRamirezAuthor

Julie Mabry To Be Honored With 2017 Humanitarian Award

Julie-Mabry-Humanitarian-Award-Winner-Face-Awards

Julie Mabry To Be Honored The 2017 Alexander Hill Humanitarian Award At FACE Awards On November 16

HOUSTON — LGBTQ+ Houston’s biggest award show announces the 2017 Alexander Hill Humanitarian Award Honoree as Julie Mabry of Houston, Texas. The announcement came on the heels of yesterday’s official nominations. The 2017 FACE Awards to be held South Beach the Nightclub in Montrose on Thursday, November 16, 2017.

The FACE Awards, Houston’s largest LGBT award show, will honor Mabry at their annual red carpet gala presented by Avenue 360 Health & Wellness, South Beach the Nightclub and CBS Radio Houston. Keeping with true tradition, the FACE Awards will not be announcing details surrounding the tribute; only saying it will be a ‘great journey.’

Honoree Julie Mabry has been a figure in the Houston LGBT community for many years, starting in bartending, event promotions and owning one of Houston’s most successful lesbian, (all welcome) bars on Washington Avenue. During the catastrophic flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey, Mabry opened her bar and started accepting donations for flood victims in our community. Beyond assisting with donations, creating Go Fund Me pages for victims, Mabry reached out to Jim ‘Mattress Mac’ McIngvale for help with others in need. Mabry’s undying devotion to keeping Houston Strong, her endless volunteer efforts, and her open heart are what true humanitarians look like.

julie-mabry-face-awards-1024x768 Julie Mabry To Be Honored With 2017 Humanitarian AwardThe first in the FACE Awards 6-year history, the award show producers announced the creation of the ‘Alexander Hill Humanitarian Award.’ Alex Hill, a young gay man whom the award is named after, died in Montrose after being hit. Pride Houston recently honored Hill with the first ‘Rainbow’ crosswalk in Texas, at the location where he died.

“It’s an amazing honor that Alex inspired people with his unconditional love and kindness.” Leo King, a friend of Hills said. “His smile, laugh, and kind aura was infectious.”

“Alex was determined to make the world a much better place than when he entered it and he certainly did,” Casey Ray, a close friend of Hills said. “Though he wasn’t allowed the opportunity to make as much of an impact as he would have liked.”

“We thought how to honor Alex,” said FACE Awards director Cade Michals. “I think by naming this special award after him, it will allow his memory to stay alive in our community.”

The 2017 FACE Awards brings many new categories, and new nominees with over twenty-one categories for the community to vote. Voting started on Wednesday and will continue until November 8th. Some of the new categories include Chef of the Year and Inspiring Hero of the Year. Also included is The ‘Jimmy Carper Trailblazer Award’ an award that will honor LGBTQ+ ‘Trailblazers’ in the Houston community.

Tricks and Treats, Pt. II

Less Than Butterflies Gay Dating Houston Halloween

Less Than Butterflies, No. 2

At a certain point, I was undoubtedly drunk. Between Stephen’s specialty Nerds-flavored shots and the shots of Fireball in conjunction with all the vodka, I was just moments away from trying to play Someone Like You on the piano in the living room over whatever Bebe Rexha was shouting about. I refrained.

The party was fun and very much alive, but I was tiring quickly and wanted to see what was going on in Montrose before I retired for the evening. Courtney and Jennifer had already made their way to Pearl for the costume contest. Carter was flitting around the party, coming back every now and then to get a little handsy as the night progressed. The drunker I became, the less I fought it off. After all, I may not have been interested in Carter, but I was alone at a party and somewhat sadder than I had been before I was this drunk. The attention wasn’t killing me.

After goodbyes with Stephen and Leo and a few other people I’d met at the party, Carter and I dashed down the stairs to our cars to meet a couple of other friends at JR’s. Montrose, however, proved to be impossible to navigate thanks to street closures for Halloween and the perennial road work always taking place throughout the neighborhood. I must have parked six blocks from JR’s (and probably illegally, at that) before I was able to make my way to the bar.

The temperature had dropped significantly in a very short time, but it hadn’t prevented anyone from wandering the streets. Even the patio of JR’s was packed with people, as was every room of the bar. Finding Carter, as well as my friends Casey and Nick, proved to be much more difficult as I squeezed my way through the unnecessarily sweaty patrons.

When I did finally find them, I had trouble keeping my attention zeroed in on the conversation. This could partly be chalked up to drunkenness, but my distraction was due to everyone else in the bar. From Casey and Nick to every other pair, it became depressingly obvious that nearly everyone in the bar was coupled off.

Where had gay Christmas gone? Where had the twinks in wings and colorful underwear tottered off to? Even the bears in leather were partnered-up. Long gone seemed the days of going out on Halloween with the intention of hooking up or meeting someone interesting who may only seem attractive at the time due to their costume. Looking around, I obsessed over the fact that out of 5 million people in the city of Houston—granted only a minority of them gay—everyone out for Halloween was already spoken for. Where were all the single people? Was there some sort of single, gay, Halloween party I hadn’t been invited to where everyone drank wine and watched Practical Magic until they’d become so drunk and suicidal that they decided to join hands and jump off the roof like Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman at the end of the movie?

Why hadn’t I been invited?

The clock struck 2 AM sooner than I’d have guessed, and Carter and I made our way through busy Montrose hand-in-hand toward our cars.

Unfortunately, like on so many occasions before, I couldn’t find my car anywhere.

Fuck,” I swore, irritated with myself for not thinking to pay more attention when I’d parked.

“It’s fine,” Carter told me as he led me to his car. “I’ll drive you around until we find it.”

If ever there came a day when I didn’t have to rely on a man to help me find my car, I might actually wake up a different person. Sadly, that was becoming more and more a trademark of who I’d become.

Finding the car didn’t take long. Once we’d passed by JR’s, I began to remember how I’d walked to the bar from my car. Carter pulled up right behind it to let me out on the corner like a hooker who’d lost her way. He leaned in to hug me, lingering a bit before he kissed me on the cheek. Once he had, I kissed his back.

What happened next I could blame on the alcohol, but I’d be lying. Being drunk had never made me do anything. I knew better than that. Still, as I moved just a little bit to the right and kissed Carter on his lips, I couldn’t compose a justifiable reason why I’d done it. He kissed me back, and we did so a little more before my senses returned to me and I pulled away.

This was not the magic of Halloween. This was a drunk, lonely gay who’d been thinking of another gay all night while taking advantage of his friend. And though Carter didn’t object and reciprocated the kiss, I was taking advantage of his kindness, and for that I felt like shit.

I bid him goodnight, then sped off in my own car. I was embarrassed. Not because Carter wasn’t cute, he certainly was. But because I’d escalated to a new level of sluttiness—the kind that involves and can harm your friendships.

I guess I really had put the ‘trick’ in trick-or-treat, even if only by way of innocently kissing a friend in whom I had no romantic interest. Worst of all, though, I felt unfulfilled. This kiss hadn’t meant anything, though maybe part of me was hoping that it would have coming from a boy who at least paid attention to me and made me feel attractive. But the magic—Halloween or otherwise—simply hadn’t been there.

Even on a night when witches were supposed to fly their broomsticks across the night sky, and spirits were said to creep from one side of the veil to the other, and twinks paraded around in their underwear and angel wings, maybe the magic of gay Halloween wasn’t resting in how much we had to drink or how slutty we became thereafter. It laid in our friendships—the unexpected ones that started off as silly crushes, and the ones that we kissed by accident that we’d never crushed on before and probably never would. Those were the people who made Halloween—a night of needless celebration—fun. They were the ones we could count on no matter what.

Return to Part I here.