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TRUTH Project Kicks Off ‘We Are Gold’ Annual Fundraiser In Houston

TRUTH Project Kicks Off ‘We Are Gold’ Annual Fundraiser In Houston

 

The 2nd Annual T.R.U.T.H. Project Kicks Off Annual Fundraiser In Montrose In October.

HOUSTON Oct 5 — The time for TRUTH has come to Houston. The T.R.U.T.H Project kicks off its annual fundraiser In Houston on Oct. 22, 12016 in Montrose. Entitled We Are Gold will be held at Zimm’s Martini & Wine Bar.

The T.R.U.T.H. Project (Telling Real Unapologetic Truths through Healing) is a 501c3 charitable organization that educates and mobilizes LGBTQ communities of color and their allies through social arts that promote mental, emotional and sexual health. The impact on the community is very surreal said Founder Kevin Anderson.

“It’s humbling to have the support of artists and healthcare providers who understand the vision for using the arts as a tool for healing through information, education, and access to resources,” Anderson said.

This year’s fundraiser will include a montage of video clips from previous installments and live demonstrations of spoken word, live music, and visual art to showcase how the T.R.U.T.H. Project connects art and health.

Since its inception, The T.R.U.T.H Project has reached more than 5,000 attendees and continues to grow. Performances are held quarterly and have addressed issues such as bullying, domestic violence, and depression. The Texas State Department of Health recognized the efforts of the T.R.U.T.H. Project and its founder, Kevin Anderson, to use the arts as a vehicle for information, awareness, and access to resources, and awarded a grant that allowed him to extend his outreach by partnering with national recording artist such as Marsha Ambrosius and Chisette Michele. He has also served as a consultant in other cities interested in starting similar initiatives.

For additional information visit:  www.TruthProjecthtx.org

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TUTS Launches Public Campaign For New Building

Margaret Alkek Williams-(Photo by Priscilla Dixon) About Magazine

Theatre Under The Stars Announces $4,000,000 Gift And Campaign For New Building.

HOUSTON Oct 26 – Houston’s Theatre Under The Stars last week kicked off their public campaign ‘JUST IMAGINE Where Dreams Take The Stage.’ Included in the announcement was the gift of $4,000,000 from Margaret Alkek Williams.

The $15 million JUST IMAGINE campaign will allow TUTS to construct a new three-story building adjacent to the current Arts and Education Center at the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts. The building will be named Margaret Alkek Williams Center for Arts and Education.

The 20,000 square foot addition will feature a 140-seat black box studio, classrooms for voice, dance and acting, and rehearsal space.

Artistic Excellence Fund will be established to incubate new theatrical works and provide funds for innovative and top-quality productions.

To date, more than $10.5 million in gifts and pledges have been secured, including major gifts from The Brown Foundation, Inc., The Wortham Foundation, Dan L Duncan Foundation, Amy and Rob Pierce, The Cullen Foundation, The Elkins Foundation, The Fondren Foundation, The Hamill Foundation, Alan and Tricia Ratliff, Randy and Sandy Stilley, HEB, and ConocoPhillips.

For more information, please visit www.tuts.com. Theatre Under The Stars is a 501c3 Non Profit Organization.

 

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Bunnies On The Bayou Host Annual Fundraiser This Weekend At Pearl Bar

Honey Bunnies Fundraiser Houston Pearl Bar About Magazine

Bunnies On The Bayou To Host ‘Honey Bunnies’ At Pearl Bar This Weekend With Co Sponsor Her Destination Unknown!

HOUSTONFEB 23 — Sunday Funday will get a little more festive this weekend on Washington Avenue as Bunnies on the Bayou hosts the annual ‘Honey Bunnies’ fundraiser.

Starting at 2 p.m. Bunnies on the Bayou partner Her Destination Unknown (HDU) will hold their annual ‘Charity Date Auction,’ where one very special ‘Bunny’ will be up for grabs. Attendees will also enjoy jello-shots and a chance to advance purchase tickets for the annual Easter weekend shindig.

Her Destination Unknown provides the LGBT lesbian community with a community beyond the lesbian community. What started as a core group of six women now consists of over seven hundred members.

Among their annual fundraisers is AIDS Foundation Houston and the Houston Food Bank. HDU has raised over $50,000 for these local non-profits.

Details: Honey Bunnies visit Facebook 

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Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American Cemetery

By  | Montrose Management District

For decades, Houstonians driving down West Dallas Street between Dunlavy and South Shepherd might have noticed an overgrown, apparently vacant lot on the south side of the street. Neglected by an absentee owner, the 5.5-acre site had become a weed-choked dumping ground, and probably seemed like a prime candidate for development. Few passing motorists would have guessed that beneath the trash and the dense underbrush was one of Houston’s most historically significant burial places.

Founded in 1896, the College Park Cemetery is one of Houston’s three remaining Jim Crow-era African-American cemeteries. (The other two are Olivewood, founded in the 1870s, and Evergreen, established in 1900.) It’s the final resting place of around 4,400 black Houstonians, including Reverend John Henry (Jack) Yates, arguably the single most important black leader in post-Civil War Houston, and the namesake of Jack Yates High School.

As fate would have it, Robert O. Robertson, the man who has spent the past 20 years leading the campaign to restore and beautify College Park, has a personal connection to Yates. Robertson is the pastor of Houston’s Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, which was founded by Yates in 1891 in historic Freedman’s Town (now the Fourth Ward). In the late 1990s Robertson was running a community service program for teenagers on probation. His office was on West Dallas, right across from an overgrown lot, so he decided to put his young charges to work cleaning up the property.

MMD_CMPCementery-21-300x199 Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American CemeteryWhen the teenagers began hacking through the weeds, they noticed a tombstone. Then another one. And another one. “When I came across the marker that said Reverend Jack Yates, I got a chill up my spine,” Robertson remembered. “I knew God had led me to that site.” Robertson began taking his probationers to the cemetery every weekend to clear brush and trash, and he started researching the cemetery’s history.

He learned that the cemetery was named for its location across from the Houston Central College for Negroes, Houston’s first black school of higher education. He also learned that interred within its grounds was the president of that college, I. M. Terrell, who went on to serve as president of Prairie View State Normal and Industrial College (now Prairie View A&M) and administrator of the Houston Negro Hospital. Also buried on the grounds is a black Texas state legislator from the Reconstruction era—one of the last black legislators, it would turn out, until Barbara Jordan in the 1960s.

Not long after he began his cleanup efforts, Robertson had to fend off an attempt by developers to deconsecrate and sell a portion of the cemetery. With help from the city of Houston, Bethel purchased the land from its owner in 1998 and later established the College Park Cemetery Association, a non-profit organization that raises money to restore and maintain the property. Thanks to the church’s efforts, in 2002 the cemetery was designated a Texas State Historical Cemetery, which guarantees it can’t be torn down.

MMD_CMPCementery-4-300x199 Inside the Effort To Restore Montrose’s Historic African-American CemeteryToday, the cemetery looks nothing like the trash-strewn lot it used to be. There’s a handsome iron fence dividing it from the street and a shell-paved road winding through the grounds; most of the overturned tombstones have been set upright, and several historical markers provide information about the cemetery. More remains to be done—the cemetery needs a new drainage system, the grounds need to be mowed twice a month, and there are plans for a small prayer garden. The association is also trying to build an endowment to ensure the cemetery is cared for in perpetuity.

More than anything else, Rev. Robertson said he wants Houston to begin giving the cemetery its proper respect. “February is Black History Month, and everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon, but we don’t pay attention to the place where these people are buried,” he said. “We say we honor Jack Yates, but we don’t honor his burial place. Martin Luther King has a beautiful place in Atlanta where he’s buried. But there were civil rights leaders before him—why not Jack Yates?”

College Park Cemetery, 3525 West Dallas Street

Tax-deductible donations to the College Park Cemetery Association can be made at collegeparkcemetery.net or mailed to College Park Cemetery Association, P.O. Box 130037, Houston, Texas 77219

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