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Candidate John C.B. LaRue

John LaRue Houston about magazine

In the upcoming Houston City Council At-Large, Position 3 race, voters looking for a progressive candidate who has a strong voice for our LGBT community need to look no further than my friend, John C.B. LaRue. I’ve known John for several years, having met him while we were both studying at South Texas College of Law. Since graduation, John lived in Washington, DC for two years working as a lobbyist in the field of historic preservation. Knowing how dedicated John is to his work, I asked him to join my practice, The Verde Law Firm PLLC, last year. He currently leads the family law section of the firm.

Over the course of the fight over HERO, John has proven to be the only candidate in the At-Large 3 race to testify in favor of the ordinance in front of City Council. In fact, John testified not once, but twice, in favor of HERO. I was also proud to represent John and his now-husband, Hunter Middleton, when we filed suit against Harris County Clerk Stan Stanart for his failure to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. On June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court issued their decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, John and Hunter went to the county courthouse to obtain a marriage license.johnFB_Pic Candidate John C.B. LaRue Mr. Stanart denied them the license, saying he lacked the proper forms. I spent the day at the courthouse with them, filing the suit to compel Stanart to issue licenses. By the end of the day, thanks to our efforts and the efforts of Harris County Attorney Vince Ryan, among others, Mr. Stanart started issuing licenses. John and Hunter were the first to receive one.

John’s platform on other issues also stands out. He knows, as any of us who drive or bike in Houston, that we have to fix our streets and sidewalks which are in an inexcusable state of disrepair. Always the pragmatist, John recognizes that we cannot balance our books while we have the so-called “revenue cap” in place. The owner of a rescue animal, John supports moving Houston to becoming a “No Kill” city. Most importantly, John will go into City Council without being part of the entrenched political system that only serves as a voice for insiders and the political establishment. I firmly believe that he is the most qualified person running in this race—he has experience in the legal system, the political system, and has lived Houston for almost 10 years in total. I am proud to call John my friend and I will be even prouder to call him our next At-Large member of the Houston City Council.

Vote for John C.B. LaRue for Houston City Council At-Large Position 3 on November 3, 2015.

4 GOP candidates sign anti-gay marriage pledge

anti-gay marriage pledge

4 GOP candidates sign anti-gay marriage pledge

Cruz, Santorum, Jindal, Carson want constitutional amendment

(Washington AP) Four of the 17 Republican presidential candidates have pledged to support a federal constitutional amendment defining marriage as a union between one man and one woman, an anti-same-sex marriage group said Tuesday.

The National Organization for Marriage said Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson signed the group’s pledge “to take several specific actions as president to restore marriage to the law and protect people of faith from discrimination because of their support for traditional marriage.”

The influence of the National Organization for Marriage — once a powerful force in funding pushes for same-sex marriage bans on the state level — has been in decline following a large swing in public support in favor of same-sex nuptials. According to Gallup, in 1996 nearly seven in 10 Americans opposed same-sex marriage, but in May 2015, 60% of Americans said they supported such unions.

And in June, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that states must recognize same-sex marriage.

“Electing a president in 2016 who is a true champion on marriage is a critical priority, something that is essential if we are to overturn the outrageous, illegitimate decision of the U.S. Supreme Court imposing same-sex ‘marriage’ on every state in the nation,” Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, said in a statement.

In addition to support for the federal constitutional amendment, the group’s pledge includes working to overturn the Supreme Court decision, nominating judges and appointing attorney generals who will apply “the original meaning of the Constitution,” and reviewing pro-gay rights policies enacted by the Obama administration.

The pledge also asks potential presidents to direct the Justice Department to investigate and publicize cases of Americans who have been harassed and threatened due to their belief that marriage is between one man and one woman.

NOM invited every candidate to sign, and Brown said the organization will not support a candidate who does not sign the pledge.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee — both courting evangelical voters — have spoken frequently about their support for traditional marriage, but declined to sign the pledge, Brown said in the release.

Both men told the group they have a blanket policy against signing pledges, Brown added.

Several GOP candidates, including former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, have stated their opposition to same-sex marriage but do not support amending the Constitution to make marriage between one man and one woman, they have said.

Harris County First Open Lesbian District Attorney Sworn In

Harris County First Open Lesbian District Attorney Sworn In

As the first openly lesbian district attorney, Kim Ogg is making history and aims to change the broken criminal justice system in Houston, Texas.

 

HOUSTON — NOV 4 — In a state that went for Trump in the 2016 presidential election, native Houstonian Kim Ogg, an Democrat, sweep the county with nearly 60 percent of the vote. Officially making her the newly elected District Attorney of Harris County, and the first openly lesbian to lead the largest DA’s office in the South.

Kim-Ogg Harris County First Open Lesbian District Attorney Sworn In
(L) Kim Ogg, and partner (R) Olivia Jordan

Having been officially sworn in as the first open lesbian for Harris County District Attorney, her son and life partner by her side. Ogg, who campaigned on victim’s rights, formally took the oath at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, a day prior to the public inauguration on Monday.

“I welcome all of you to a new era of criminal justice,” Ogg said. “My vision for the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is for us together to fulfill this purpose, by making our paramount goal public safety and evidence-based justice for all,” she explained.

“I welcome all of you to a new era of criminal justice” – Kim Ogg, Harris County District Attorney

Winning the office in a Democratic tidal wave, Ogg says she strives to accomplish, “keeping the public safe, constantly strive for equality in our use of prosecutorial discretion, to treat those accused of crimes fairly and to treat all crime victims with dignity.”

Ogg thanked her partner of 32 years, Olivia Jordan, their son, Jack, her colleagues in the DA’s office, law enforcement officials and many others during the ceremony.

Queer Houston, We Have a Problem

endorse lupe valden jenifer rene pool

What the actual heck is the GLBT Political Caucus thinking?

(HOUSTON)—Over the weekend, the Houston GLBT Political Caucus announced its long-winded list of endorsements for the 2018 primary elections, which are now only one month away (March 6th, 2018). The list, which consists of 60 names—59 Democrats and 1 Republicanhosts some notable names, from Beto O’Rourke to Fran Watson and beyond. However, it also is missing a couple of not only recognizable, but very important names in two very important slots.

Jenifer Rene Pool for the Texas House of Representatives and Lupe Valdez for governor. Why do these names matter? Well, for one, Pool was the president of Houston’s GLBT Political Caucus from 2006 until 2008. And then there’s the fact that she was also the first trans person to ever win a primary election in Texas in 2016 (although, she was defeated in November). As for Valdez, well, she made history by being one of the first democrats elected to office in Dallas in 2004 after a long span of time, and by being the only Latina sheriff in the entire nation elected and serving in 2004. Now, as their political candidacies are just a month shy of votes that could disconcert the Texas political establishment, Houston’s GLBT Political Caucus has pulled a very Texas-fitting move by endorsing straight, white men rather than these two queer women.

A little more background on these two women:

Jenifer-Rene-Pool-1 Queer Houston, We Have a ProblemJenifer Rene Pool is more than just a trans womanshe’s a successful businesswoman and advocate who not only has been appointed to the Buildings and Standards Commission, the Police Advisory Commission, the Task Force on Buildings and Standards, the Special Task Force on Film in Houston, the Houston Police Advisory Committee, but has also served thoroughly and actively in the LGBTQIA community for decades and owns her own consulting firm. In 2016 (as aforementioned), Pool became the first trans person to ever win a primary election in the state of Texas, beating opponent Erik Hassan for the Harris County Commissioner’s Court, District 13 seat by a staggering margin. Pool pulled in 78.28% of the votes. Hassan, on the other hand, reeled in only 21.72%. In November, Pool lost the seat to Republican candidate Steve Radack, but by a much smaller margin than Hassan had lost to her in the primary. Radack won with approximately 58%, leaving pool with about 42%. Now, Pool is running for the Texas House of Representatives, heavily emphasizing the repair of infrastructure, implementing comprehensive flood protection, reforming education to a quality standard, and so much more.

TLMD_LUPE_VALDEZ-e1517945975587-300x229 Queer Houston, We Have a ProblemLupe Valdez has served as a captain in the US Army, and has also worked as a federal agent. She served as Sheriff of Dallas County from 2004 until just last year. Valdez’s work in the federal government involved investigating fraud in the country, as well a crime corps outside the country. As the sheriff, she spent a great deal of time reforming prisons that were understaffed and overpopulated. Her advocacy for inmates extended even further, however, seeking better care for prisoners suffering mental illness. As mentioned before, Valdez was one of a handful of LGBTQIA elected public servants serving over the course of her career as sheriff; and when she began in 2004, she was the only Latina in the entire country to hold the title of sheriff. Now, Valdez is running for governor. Valdez is running on higher minimum wages, equal pay, affordable college educations, affordable healthcare, more and better public transit options, and raising the standard of education.

Unarguably, these are two strong political candidates. Right? And they just so happen to identify as LGBTQIA. Still, Pool and Valdez aren’t the only two LGBTQIA candidates running for office. In fact, there are almost fifty queer people running in Texas alone. Certainly, they can’t all win. Still, that doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t be given the opportunity to win.

Jennifer-Rene-Pool-e1312640557522-225x300 Queer Houston, We Have a ProblemI’m a staunch believer that we shouldn’t elect queer people just because they’re queer. I wouldn’t be electing Caitlin Jenner just because she’s trans. She’s also a Republican who endorsed Donald Trump. Not quite my cup of tea. However, among those near-fifty candidates that we’re talking about, nearly all are running on the Democratic ticket and are talking about issues that matter to the LGBTQIA community. After all, when it comes down to it, we’re concerned about the same things that cis and straight people are. We just want to be safe and afforded the same opportunities. But more than anything, what the community needs right now and more than ever is representation. Rare is the occasion that any given person is going to agree with each and every political stance taken by any given politician; but even rarer—especially in the LGBTQIA community—is the opportunity to be represented by a majority of politicians. We’re a community of minorities that converges like a Venn Diagram with other minority groups. We’re made up of gay people, trans people, bisexual people, black people, Hispanic people, Jewish people, Asian people, disabled people, veterans, asexuals, the non-binary, and so many more. Unlike the representation we see in our government—especially so in our state’s government—we are more than just white, cisgender, straight, male faces. So, why is that so much of what we’re seeing? And more importantly, why are those the faces that the Houston GLBT Political Caucus is endorsing over queer trans women or queer women of color? 

Screen-Shot-2017-12-06-at-6.20.19-AM_1512562828089_11882921_ver1.0-300x225 Queer Houston, We Have a ProblemThough it was reported in 2017 that Congress is now composed of 19% nonwhite individuals, there are only seven people who identify as LGBTQIA currently serving—less than 2%. Worse still? Only one of those 7 is a nonwhite person. So, if we take this information into consideration, and if we bother to ask why in 2018 we’re still seeing a giant lack of representation in our national and state government systems, it is equally important to ask why the Houston GLBT Political Caucus is endorsing straight, cisgender, white men in place of a strong trans woman and a Latin lesbian. Both of these women have worked tirelessly over the course of their political careers to ensure safety for the LGBTQIA community and who want to bring their voices—our voices—to Austin to make effective change.

As someone told me lately, “If the Caucus ain’t gonna support you [queer people], who will?”

To hear the Caucus’s new and sitting president tell it, as reported to MyStatesman, “We absolutely, positively wanted to endorse Lupe, but she didn’t do as well as we would have liked in the interview.” But that doesn’t quite seem like a good enough excuse. When it comes down to politics, the public eye never leaves a politician, especially not in the current era of 24-hour news coverage. A politician’s reliability, their credibility, and their flat-out ability to do the job aren’t solely based on one interview. They’re based on what work the candidate in question has done to effect change in the community. And neither Pool nor Valdez has carried out a career lacking said efficacy. Moreover, their careers—possibly even somewhat stunted due to their LGBTQIA statuses—have not come without pressures that their candidates have never had to face. As women—one trans and one cis—and as members of this community, both of these ladies have jumped hurdles to assume and maintain the positions they’ve fought tirelessly for to protect the well-being of other people. And, let’s be honest, these are both women of a certain age. That’s not a jab at them—that’s a jab at the times in which they’ve had to be unafraid and unabashed in order to make the strides they’ve made to get to where they are. Their political lives have had to shatter more glass ceilings than many in politics can ever imagine having existed.

 

andrew-white-300x201 Queer Houston, We Have a Problem
Andrew White, who won the Caucus’s governor endorsement over Valdez

And, as a community of mixed voices—gay, bi, trans, non-binary, lesbian, black, Asian, Hispanic, and more—we need heroes that are comfortable being uncomfortable to stand up, sword and shield in hand, to say no to the assholes in Austin who seek to shove us back into the holes we’ve worked so hard to wiggle our way out of. No more bathroom bills. No more denying us spousal benefits for city employees. No more revoking our right to marry. No more refusal to change gender markers. We need leaders whose voices reflect the people who are underserved—and we are the underserved. I’m not sorry to say that I don’t need a straight, white, cisgender man making decisions for my big, fat, gay life, just like our trans brothers and sisters don’t need one making decisions for them, and just like our lesbian sisters don’t need them making decisions for them, and just like our non-binary siblings don’t need them making decisions for them. We all need a voice that sounds a bit more like ours—a perspective that has been shaped by adversity and experience.

adam-e1517946106222-300x297 Queer Houston, We Have a Problem
Adam Milasincic, who won the endorsement over Pool.

With that said, I’m not sure what the Houston GLBT Political Caucus was thinking when they made these decisions. No offense to Andrew White or Adam Milasincic, the men endorsed in place of Pool and Valdez. Their resumes are impressive, but they’ve also lived lives of white boy privilege. If we’re going to continue talking about draining the swamp and equality and reclaiming our time and nevertheless persisting, our community and the organizations and caucuses that self-proclaim to represent the politics of our best interests need to recognize that it’s time to stop endorsing straight, white, cisgender men in lieu of people who have walked down the roads we have. As someone told me lately, “If the Caucus ain’t gonna support you [queer people], who will?”

Houston GLBT Political Caucus, shame on you. Shame on you for not supporting our trans sister and our sister of color. Sure, they may seem like the underdogs right now. But isn’t that what all of us in this community are? The underdogs? Isn’t that what all of your sitting board members were at some point? But in 2018—a year into a presidency of pussy-grabbing, trans military-banning, and wall-building—you need to be setting the example that even the underdog deserves a chance to shine. You need to be elevating our people and putting them on a pedestal and telling not only these candidates, but the world, “Yes. You can do this. You are the best person to represent our community.” And you have failed in doing that here. As happy as I am that you have endorsed many candidates that I think are going to go out there and use their voices to do great things for us, I am so disappointed in you for discouraging two strong, fierce-as-fuck women when you had the chance to expose them to people who need to know they’re out there fighting for us.

Shame on you.

And queer Houstonians, yes, we have a problem. But we are the only people who have the power to fix that problem. So, on March 6th, get up, go out, and vote. Vote for the queer people on the ballot—no matter who has or has not endorsed them. Make your voices heard. Because the louder that we shout, the more of us that show up, the harder we fight back to be heard and seen and to live an equal and happy life, the more the world will change for the better.

Vote.