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Christina Wells Takes the ‘America’s Got Talent’ Live Show

Christina Edwards Wells Music America’s Got Talent LGBTQ Houston
Photo by Tasha Gorel.

Hometown LGBTQ favorite and 2017 Pride SuperStar, Christina Edwards Wells, will take the stage at the America’s Got Talent Live Show tonight — here’s how you can help her progress to the semifinals.

(HOLLYWOOD) – After an agonizing near-two months of waiting to hear her sing again and a couple of breathtaking performances from Houston’s very own Christina Edwards Wells, the 43-year-old LGBTQ singer will take the stage during the live shows of the quarterfinals on NBC’s America’s Got Talent tonight at 7 PM central. Wells, who has worked as a nurse in Houston for nearly fifteen years, was last seen in a prerecorded episode that aired on July 17th. At that performance, Wells received acclaim from the judges, including Simon Cowell who noted, We had to make decisions based on who do we think could really do well in the live show.” After a drama-filled pause, Cowell continued, “And that’s why, Christina, we have decided to put you through to the live shows.” Guest judge Ken Jeong (of Dr. Ken and The Hangover fame) shared with Christina that when he decided to stop practicing medicine to become a comedian — the actor-comedian once played a fictional version of his medical self in the short-lived, aforementioned ABC sitom — that his wife told him, “You’re no longer a doctor. You’re a comedian.” Jeong went on to tell Wells, “You’re no longer a nurse, you’re a singer […] an artist.”

Wells is nothing short of a celebrity here in Houston. In our recent Pride Edition interview, Wells told About that even her nursing career was filled with her beautiful singing voice. During Hurricane Harvey, the singer was so overwhelmed by the tragedy and so inspired by her city of Houston heroes, she wrote a song entitled “Come Hell or High Water” as a tribute to those who fought, lost their lives, and survived. Wells won Pride Houston’s Pride SuperStar competition in 2017 and has been an active supporter of the LGBTQ community in Houston, of which she is a part.

With Wells advancing performing tonight, audiences will have the chance to vote to keep her progressing on to the semifinals, which will begin airing performances on September 4th. Audiences may start voting tonight following Wells’ performance and can vote until 7 AM central time on August 29th — and each person can vote up to 10 times from the same phone number or email address any of the various ways. A friend of About Magazine, Christina Edwards Wells herself reached out and shared with us how audiences can cast their votes after her performance tonight.

“Okay, you guys, there are four ways to vote,” Wells said before listing off the four ways to vote — as the rising star has been sharing in cute videos and posts shared to her social media pages in recent days (see below with her equally talented bandmate, Alli Villines and her ukulele Hildegard). Here are the four ways you, her fans and loved onescan make sure that Christina stays on the show after tonight:

1. Call the 1-866-XXX-XXXX number … and make sure to do it 10 times to get 10 votes in. No. Seriously. Call 10 times. And make all your friends vote ten times, too.

This is the most basic and old school way to vote for Christina. The number to call will be available on the television screen immediately after Christina’s performance and updated here on the About Magazine website. We’ll also be updating all our social media accounts with this number. Don’t eff this up, guys. It’s literally the easiest way to vote.

2. Download the America’s Got Talent app! You can vote 10 for each email address you log in with!!

And … c’mon, guys. Let’s be real. You know that you have like 60 email addresses. I have one for this magazine, one personal one, I still think I have one for my old job that works, and I have one for my secret double life I lead on the internet as an Amish dominatrix. I bet Christina would use all of her emails to make accounts to vote for you, so you should probably do the same fo her. Plus, she’d probably sing you some inspiring song after and to build you up like she did with … I don’t know … all the patients she was stuck in the hospital caring for and the other medical staff during Hurricane Harvey. Yeah. That’s right. She isn’t just a badass person; she’s a great human being. So go vote for her.  Capisce?

You can download the app on iTunes by clicking here.

3. Go to NBC website and you can vote 10 times for each email address you have!!!

Don’t act like you don’t have a work email, too. Okay? Because you bet your ass that I will personally call Susan from HR and ask her how many of those ‘per my last email’ replies she’s had to send you over the last month. Susan is sick of you heating up fish in the break room microwave and doesn’t really like you. But do you know who does like and who might let you use her microwave to reheat fish? Christina Edwards Wells. So go vote for her.

Here’s the link.

4. If you are an XFinity customer with the XFinity X1 remote control, then you can speak into it and say, “Vote AGT!”

This isn’t gonna be one of those things where dumb Siri or dumb Alexa doesn’t understand what it is you’re saying. The XFinity remote wants Christina to move on, too. But because the XFinity remote isn’t a human, she can’t vote for Christina, just like she wasn’t able to vote for Hillary in 2016. She’s remorseful about the latter, but is trying to make it up to us by helping Christina win America’s Got Talent. So, do this. It’s easy. And if you’re not an XFinity customer, you call whatever crap cable provider you have, cancel your service, and sign up for XFinity before 7 AM tomorrow.

Houston is full of immense talent in music, on the stage, on the screen, on the field, in literature (*cough* preorder my new book *cough*) and behind the scenes of so many different professions. But how often do we get to see someone that we all know and love take the stage on national TV to get their long-overdue shot at stardom? And how often is that person an LGBTQ person of color who saves lives for a living and is genuinely one of the most kind hearted people in the world?

Not that often.

About Magazine wants to help Christina succeed and we want to make sure that our loyal followers help her, too. So please take the time to watch her perform tonight — you can even head down to the very delicious Spanky’s Pizza in Pasadena to watch the show live — and make sure you vote. If you haven’t voted at least 30 times (40 for XFinity customers) you’re trash. Sorry about it, but it’s true.

Everyone at About is sending you our love and support, Christina! Break a leg. And readers, if you don’t vote for Christina, we may have to break some legs ourselves.

christina-gif Christina Wells Takes the 'America's Got Talent' Live Show

GLAAD Announces Media Awards Nominees

Glaad Media Awards 2016 Nominees

(CNN)GLAAD announced the nominees for the 27th annual GLAAD Media Awards on Wednesday, and for the first time, more than 50% of the English-language nominations are trans-inclusive.

Nominees include Oscar-nominated films like “Carol” and popular TV shows such as “Empire” and “Orange is the New Black.” Streaming services earned a record seven nominations (up from three last year), with Netflix bagging five of those.

The nominees for outstanding film (wide release) are “Carol,” “The Danish Girl,” “Dope,” “Freeheld” and “Grandma.” “Arrow,” “Black Sails,” “Empire,” “The Fosters,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “How to Get Away with Murder,” “Nashville,” “Orphan Black,” “Sense8” and “Shameless” are nominated for outstanding drama series.

Outstanding reality program nominees are “I Am Cait,” “I Am Jazz,” “New Girls on the Block,” “The Prancing Elites Project” and “Transcendent.”

GLAAD — the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender advocacy organization — announced 101 nominees in 20 English-language categories and 46 Spanish-language nominees in 11 categories. Cable networks earned 27 nominations while broadcast networks garnered 18.

“For nearly three decades, the GLAAD Media Awards have propelled inclusion in media and driven LGBT acceptance forward,” GLAAD Chief Executive Officer and President Sarah Kate Ellis said in a statement. “This year’s nominees have raised the bar for creating thoughtful and diverse LGBT images and storylines, deepening audiences’ understanding of LGBT people and accelerating acceptance across the world.”

GLAAD Media Awards ceremonies will be April 2 at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles and May 14 at the Waldorf Astoria in New York. For the first time in a decade, the ceremony will be aired on Logo in April.

FORMER HOUSTON ‘GAY MAN’ CO-STARS IN DAVEY WAVEY’S ‘GUIDE TO BOTTOMING’

Colby Melvin, a Houston to Los Angeles transplant, and former About Magazine cover model co-stars in social media video that claims to be the “Official Guide To Bottoming”

It’s defiantly not a video for someone that’s offended easily. It’s also a gamble to determine if it’s funny or a little too much information. You decide.

In ‘The Gay Bottom Bible’, (yes, it’s really called that) gay personality Davey Wavey and co-star Colby Melvin from Houston attempt to answer every question you might have ever had when it comes to A$$ sex. It also includes something that you might not care to know.

Frank Billingsley: Mothers, Marriage, and Meteorology

Frank Billingsley

Mothers, Marriage, and Meteorology

A closer look at KPRC Chief Meteorologist Frank Billingsley and his new book Swabbed and Found.

(HOUSTON) — Frank Billingsley is no stranger to the City of Houston. In fact, he’s been in the living rooms of Houstonians for years as KPRC Channel 2’s chief meteorologist—a position he assumed over twenty years ago in 1995. Despite how well we may feel we know him—Frank has never held back from sharing details of his personal life—there are still many things that the public doesn’t know about him.

Many of those details are outlined in Frank’s new book, Swabbed and Found, which chronicles his life not just as a meteorologist, but as a gay man and a child of adoption. The latter recently led Frank upon an incredible, sordid, and sometimes complicated journey to discover better who he is and where he comes from.

I sat down with Frank in the weeks following Hurricane Harvey to discuss the book, his life before this journey, coming out, and, of course, the weather.

Billingsley states that while his sister—who is also adopted—for years yearned to find out more about her birth parents, the need to know about his own had never overwhelmed him. In fact, it wasn’t until his colleague and dear friend, Dominique Sachse, presented him with an email link about biological genealogy testing that he even considered it a possibility. After all, his home state was a closed-records state that didn’t allow for adoption records to be released if requested to remain closed by the birth parents. At least not without “a lot of trouble and a lot of money,” as Frank put it himself in our interview.

“That was the first time that I had realized that it [genealogical science] had become sophisticated enough and that the database had become as big as it is … It’s like a fingerprint. It’s so unique that it can link you to another person.”

Yet, it was that link that led Mr. Billingsley down a road to discovering his birth mother—who he has since met and with whom he has established a relationship. As Frank puts it, “not everybody wants that information,” when it comes to finding the people that put them up for adoption. However, that knowledge led him to a more enlightened state of being—closure even. To hear Frank make a compelling argument on the idea of closure and finality, “Closure is closure. And closure is very often sad. You close life with a funeral. You close relationships with a glass of wine. You close jobs with hugs and tears. But closure is a part of life.”

SF_FNLcvr-683x1024 Frank Billingsley: Mothers, Marriage, and MeteorologyClosure, however, did prove harder for some than others. Billingsley’s aforementioned sister did discover her family, only to find that her birth mother had passed of cancer and that her father wasn’t open to a relationship with her. She did, however, find that she had half-siblings, with whom she has maintained contact.

When the conversation circled around to Frank being gay—Frank and his husband Kevin, with whom he has a stepson, married on December 12th, 2012—I asked Frank about coming out to his parents in a decade not as accepting as the 2010s. Frank admits that it wasn’t easy, but that it wasn’t as difficult as the coming out stories that are often told. He states that his adopted father admitted he didn’t understand homosexuality, but knew how smart Frank was. He continued to tell his son that if someone as smart as Frank thought that it was okay, there couldn’t be anything wrong with being gay. “

However, when it came down to meeting his biological mother, Billingsley admits that there was a moment where it felt as though he had to come back out of the closet. He states that his mother, like his adopted parents, is a devout Christian, and that maybe she does not understand homosexuality.

Being someone in the media, Frank is never without news in his face. A supporter of the strides that the Obama Administration made for LGBTQ people, I asked Frank what he thought of the current administration, and whether or not he worried that rights would be stripped away from LGBTQ people. He seemed hopeful, stating, “I don’t think that the legislation would be there to support that. And if it does, I don’t think the people who vote for the legislature will support that. I don’t think we want to see our country go back.” He continued, “When we’re dealing with human beings, and their rights to be human beings, taking a deep breath and pondering whether the decisions concerning their rights are futile. If you look at the trans military ban—you have generals who are saying, ‘No, no!’ It’s bad enough we’re banning Muslims … and now this?”

As far as Hurricane Harvey is concerned, Billingsley was concerned for what he proudly refers to as “my city,” a phrase Houstonians everywhere are familiar with and that binds us together. He states he wasn’t surprised by how the city came together, nor was he surprised by the impact of the storm—which he himself predicted to bring as much as 50” of rain to certain areas surrounding the city.

Billingsley’s book (being released by Houston’s Bright Sky Press) is a page-turner. It’s one that Houstonians will read with ease because each word can be heard in Billingsley’s voice. That won’t stop it from gathering attention outside Houston, however. For there’s much more appeal in a story the story than just Frank’s fame. In fact, it would be fair to say that anyone who has ever had uncertainties about who they are will have a difficult time putting the book down. However, in this debut chronicle of his life, his main message rings loud and clear:

Regardless of color, orientation, race, nationality, religion, age, size—people are people. We’re all related by that fact. And as such, people all deserve the same rights and respects.

And if there may be no better mouthpiece in Houston for that message to come from than Frank himself—a smart, successful, well-round, and well-respected gay man and pillar of the LGBTQ community.