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School of Fabulosity: Serena Williams

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Serena Williams Catsuit Tutu Fashion Black

Serena Williams — the Black girl magic expert and tennis pro — has made some bold choices on the court at the 2018 US Open, and critics have been … well … critical. But what if the tutu and catsuit were about more than just fashion? And so what if they weren’t?

What I love about expressing fabulosity is challenging the norms of what should be worn on my body. I receive verbal harassment and laughs as if my total purpose of dressing up was to cause a commotion. My fashion choices (along with creating music) are the colors I use to paint my world. And although people in this world try to bring me down for showcasing my truth proudly, I stay in the game. Another perfect example of this concept was embodied through Serena Williams’ uniforms designed by Nike and Virgil Abloh worn in the US Open this year.

Serena Williams Catsuit Tutu Fashion Black

Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images

Granted, I have never sat down and watched a full tennis match, but have seen multiple clips of Serena serving superhuman powers and looks on the court. And this year, Williams has reached an apex of style and power. When Serena wore her catsuit to the first match, she mentioned how she “felt like a warrior princess” in her Black Panther-inspired look, which was received with negative responses causing it to be banned because the uniform did not “respect the game”. But did they know she was wearing that suit for blood circulation? Were misogyny and racism behind that decision to ban the catsuit? This isn’t the first instance of Serena being “disrespectful” in the game.

In the early ’90s, Serena and her sister, Venus, received criticism for sporting beaded braids on the court, while other competitors (primarily white) wore ponytails. They continued to make bold choices with their hairstyles and uniforms — reinforcing the importance of presenting black style in their arena. Along with negative feedback for effervescent style choices, Serena Williams has been drug tested five times, according to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (versus her sister being tested twice). She has even taken to Twitter saying, “…and it’s that time of the day to get “randomly” drug tested and only test Serena. Out of all the players it’s been proven I’m the on getting tested the most. Discrimination? I think so.” But what’s so cool about Serena is that she still pursues this career. She stays with the mantra of doing whatever it takes to have a clean sport.

I really don’t know the full intentions (although they seem quite obvious) of the catsuit being banned, but Serena instead continues to answer with class and magic. The next couple of matches Serena was seen wearing tutus in black and light violet. Although the looks were more “gender appropriate”, Serena still made a statement by bringing more glitter to the game. As someone that walks this earth like a runway in the daytime, I felt an instant connection with the controversy around the catsuit. As fabulous people, our bodies are continuously policed and causing us to fear for our lives because our truth offends people who are scared to live theirs. Serena could continue responding with angry tweets and calling out the game for their blatant prejudice, but she has decided to twirl on her haters with style and extraordinary determination to be a strong voice for black girls and female athletes around the world.

Serena Williams Catsuit Tutu Fashion Black

Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images

Stoo Gogo is a fashion and beauty contributor for About Magazine. Though he is known as the other half of BLING ST. (a local Pop band that received billing as the #1 Houston Album of 2017 by the Houston Chronicle), Stoo has always utilized fashion as a tool within his creative and personal lives. By collaborating with Gin Martini, Stoo is ready to explore the fabulosity living in Houston. He lives in and works from Houston, Texas.

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Clothing Does Not Have a Gender Identity

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gender clothing fashion identity

I am a cisgender, gay man who often wears women’s clothes. I’m neither a drag queen, nor am I trans. I just really, really like fashion and gender-bending.

When I was only a few years old, I had a fascination with a pair of silver heels that my mother had in her closet but rarely ever wore — and let’s be honest, even in the 90s, it was probably better that she didn’t wear them. At the time it was easy enough for my mother to rationalize my obsession with her footwear: I had a VHS copy of Disney’s animated Cinderella that I watched on a loop, and the silver heels reminded me of Cinderella’s own glass slippers. I was a child who was obsessed with the idea of magic in its many shapes and forms, and those shoes were the closest manifestation of magic that I had in the house. After all, it wasn’t as if my Southern Baptist mother kept magic wands or cauldrons lying around.

Though my family let me play out my make-believe, I’ve had relatives since then tell me they knew that I was gay going back as far as to the time of those silver shoes. But back then I was just a child who didn’t have a father with no real knowledge of gender norms that had predominantly been raised by his mother and grandmother, save for the occasional stepfather. Although, as I got older, my infatuation with clothing that wasn’t made for boys only increased. In line with my magical obsessions, when friends and I would act out scenes from movies or TV shows — let’s take Sleeping Beauty as an example — I would drape myself in cloak-like sheets to personify characters such as the villainess Maleficent. That was just the kid I was. I was obsessed with witches, and as an adult now I can understand that better, but will save that rationale for another essay. But this activity bled over into my teenage and adult lives. I grew my hair out to chin and then shoulder-length in middle school, chose flowing Halloween costumes I thought were cute, and even began to design — albeit, quite poorly — clothing I thought might suit me better than the choices boys were given.

It wasn’t until over a year after I came out in my early twenties that I started playing seriously with clothing that was a little more gender-neutral followed by choices that were unmistakably gender-bending. Now, it took quite a long time for me to get comfortable enough with my body to be able to wear these items of clothing and feel comfortable doing so. After all, a lot of them left parts of my arms, chest, back, stomach, shoulders, back, and legs exposed that clothing considered to be “male” normally would not. But when I started to find clothing that looked good on my body and that celebrated it in a way that I felt my body should be celebrated, I never even once thought about not giving myself the option to do so. I began wearing tops with V-necks that cut down just above my belly button. I found the comfort that could be provided by a pair of leggings under a long shirt. I enjoyed the flow of a skirt and the sexiness of a midriff top and the appeal of makeup and the fun accents of scarves, shawls, and jewelry. Hell, I even wore a dress and shaved my legs to perform in a show back in October — although the dress had more to do with the fact  that I was singing “Defying Gravity” from Wicked. What I found as I wore these things was that I wasn’t just playing dress-up as a kid anymore. I was making a statement about my who Anthony was as a person.

gender clothing fashion identityThat’s where things began to get tricky though. The more that I made the conscious choice to bend the rules of what was socially acceptable to wear for men in an effort to express myself, the more people struggled to understand my identity. Even just as recent as two weeks ago while at a concert with my best friend in Dallas, a gay couple I’d bummed a cigarette off of asked me if I was a trans woman, as I was wearing high-waisted, black, skinny jeans, a green top tied in the front to expose my mid-section just a bit, a full face of make-up, and my favorite black matte lipstick. My friend — who teases me about everything — found this to be funny, but by this point I’d gotten to a place where I was used to it.

You see, in the past I might have been made uncomfortable by such questions, simply because I was fearful that I was presenting as a female and that people would have some sort of adverse reaction to that or that they wouldn’t be able to accept the fact that I am anatomically male and that I identify as such. I was neither upset nor was I offended for being confused for a trans person. I was afraid of being confused for a trans person, because as much as I was expressing my identity through my clothing, my clothing was not just an expression of my identity, not a definition. After all, the gender norms associated with clothing are a societal construct; they grasp no bearing on my identity. I was and continue to be a person who constructs their own rules and likes to turn heads. I’m a cisgender, gay man — plain and simple. Do I gender-bend with my clothing? Hell yeah. Am I drag queen? Noooope. In fact, I’ve never even had the slightest interest in performing as a drag queen. And that’s just the thing: I’ve never wanted to be, nor have I ever felt like I am anything other than a boy. I’ve never felt that I was born in the wrong anatomical body and I’ve never believed myself to be a woman. I’m just a gay guy who loves the look and feel of clothes that are typically manufactured for women and who thinks that it’s bullshit that we live in a society so contaminated with dangerous gender norms that we can’t wear certain colors or designs or fabrics.

As a kid and well into adulthood, I struggled with my weight. I had issues with my body, although not ones that extended to my genitalia. Trust me, I love that part. But as a teenager, I always struggled with feeling fat and I worried about what clothes and haircuts made me look like through the eyes of others. Throughout my last three years of high school, I suffered from bulimia nervosa, and in my final year, I got so addicted to weighing myself that I was running seven miles in the morning before school and seven miles at night before bed. And while that might seem to be a silly thing to worry about, it was a very real thing for me. As an extension, the clothes that were made for young men weren’t well-suited for my body. But even as I’ve become more comfortable and confident with my body, I don’t find that “masculine” clothing always makes me feel attractive. Sometimes it does, other times it doesn’t. Although, I’ll be the first to admit, my problem stems from an even larger social ideology about what is and is not perceived to be attractive. Still, I’m human; and a part of the human condition — at least, I believe — is to want to be desired by others and to feel attractive.

Now, I don’t wear strictly clothing made for women. I wear a lot of different articles of apparel made for a lot of different people, and that’s really only because I absolutely love fashion. Most of my favorite outfit combinations are those that mix-and-match clothes that you wouldn’t find in the same department or section of a store. For instance, just last night I wore a pair of black leggings over a very low-cut, black V-neck with a large, elastic, black belt around my waist, my long, brown hair pulled back in a ponytail, green lipstick, and a pair of black, men’s dress shoes. And let me tell you, henny, I looked real good. So good, in fact, that I wore the same outfit again tonight to a different event. But the point of me wearing it isn’t about me identifying as male or female, as clothing throughout the ages has shifted and bent to what is considered “male” or “female” or “neutral” or whatever. My experience with fashion is about me expressing not my gender identity, but my personality. And, if anything, I’m identifying myself as a person who is confident enough to wear whatever the fuck he wants, so long as it’s something that makes himself feel sexy and classy and sometimes — if I’ve had enough tequila shots — even a little slutty.

I’m a dude. My pronouns are he/him/his. I love drag queens, and I love my trans and nonbinary siblings in the queer community. We’re just different in this way. Sure, my friends and I all call each other ‘she’, and sure I’m going to get mistaken for being a trans or nonbinary person probably for the rest of my life; and I’m perfectly okay with that. Certainly I will not wear a tux to my wedding when and if some poor man ever decides that he’s not going to do any better than a loud-mouthed, alcoholic kvetch with a mild drug problem who says whatever he wants whenever he wants and eats way too much pasta. But I’m still a guy; and while I believe that gender is a very broad spectrum and I am vehemently in support of my trans brothers and sisters and nonbinary siblings, being a gay man is an important part of my identity — just as correctly gendering trans and nonbinary people is an important part of theirs. If you mistake me for a woman or for a trans person or for someone who’s nonbinary, I’m not going to be upset about it. Recently, I’ve even begun to laugh about it, simply because it’s kind of refreshing to know that we’re slowly getting to a place in history where more and more people are comfortable asking your pronouns so that they don’t upset you. But I will politely remind you that I am a cisgender, gay male who just so happens to sometimes wear tops targeted toward and sold to women because I know what I look hot in. But more importantly, because I feel hot in them. And based solely upon the number of men who asked me for my phone number last night, I’d say it’s not all in my head.

I say all of this not to go on the defensive. I don’t care about that. I’ll answer to pretty much anything except ‘sober’. Again, it’s encouraging to know that more and more people are becoming conscientious of gender identity and are wanting to affirm the genders of others to include them in the canvas of society. I say these things because I know there is probably someone else out there who grew up wearing his mother’s silver heels after watching Cinderella on a loop that got teased or made fun of that isn’t quite where I am in terms of feeling comfortable in skin and clothing. And to those little boys (or to the little girls in vice versa or however it may apply to anyone), I say this:

Wear what makes you feel good, and let that goodness blossom into confidence. Not that it matters what other people think, but if you feel sexy, chances are that other people will find you sexy, too. Appeal isn’t really about what you’re wearing or how your makeup is done or if you had time to get your hair curled or your nails painted. It’s about exerting confidence in how you look and showing other people that you don’t care whether or not they like it so long as you do. And that’s the real key to sexiness — not in the eyes of others, but in those of yourself: confidence.

And as a sex columnist and a Grade A Snacc, I know a thing or two about what’s sexy; and it’s in all of us. You just have to make sure that it feels right to you. Nothing else matters.

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Review: TomboyX Clothing

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TomboyX Women underwear

TomboyX — the women’s clothing line for you ladies searching for underwear that provide the comfort and breathability that men’s underwear provide — sent us some products to test out. Here’s what About Magazine seems to think.

I am a size 16, hour glass-shaped woman who wears a size 38H bra. Having larger breasts has made buying clothing an … interesting experience. If it fits in the waist, I look like a porn star. If it fits up top, I’m wearing a circus tent. That being said, it’s always nice to come across brands who create clothing with the thought of all women’s body types in mind. Let’s take a look at a few that I was lucky enough to try on for size (no pun intended).

TomboyX Women underwearThe Essentials Soft Bra XL

I was pleasantly surprised that this fit me! It is incredibly rare for any top that isn’t made by exact bra size to fit me and be comfortable. The fabric is so very soft. Even the band is soft! It also stays very well. The essential soft bra will cradle your ladies like a warm, pink, fuzzy cloud of awesome and understanding. I will wear this around the house for the rest of my life. The only complaint I have with this bra, isn’t just with this bra. It’s with every soft bra. THE DREADED UNIBOOB! However, I find that it doesn’t particularly bother me.

TomboyX Women underwearThe Boy Shorts XL

Okay, but can we talk about how good my ass looks in these? These boy shorts matched the essential soft bra! Yay for matching undies! This fun, Halloween print was perfect for a romp through Phobia, the haunted house. These undies are soft. Hella soft. I forgot I was wearing them, soft. This is the softest band I’ve ever had hug my fabulous hips. They are also flattering in all the right places. 10/10

TomboyX Women underwearThe Dog Days Iconic Briefs

First, these briefs are from a new series of underwear. They are featuring dogs vs. cats! Which do you like better? I love them both! My three rescue dogs (Elvis, Blondie, Axl Rose) and my two rescue cats (Buster and Billy Idol) can testify to that. Dogs and cats! Living together! Oh my! This particular pair features dogs. It has the signature soft band and fabric. It is really cute on my assets. I enjoyed these quite a bit.

About the Company

TomboyX might be one of my new favorites. They pay a living wage to everyone in their company. They use a phenomenally diverse set of models for their clothing. They include and celebrate our trans brothers and sisters. After the unfortunate comments from Victoria’s Secret this past week, it’s nice to see other quality underwear companies that we can shop our consciences with. They have a huge variety of styles for all sizes. Their nudes cover a spectrum of colors. I’m particularly fond of their 9-inch briefs. They feel amazing, and protect my thighs from being so awesome, that they rub together and start a fire.

I have yet to see a bra that they’ve made that can lift and separate my ginormous breasts. I sincerely hope they’re working on it! The price point is a bit high for many people. If you’re used to running down to Target and grabbing 7 days’ worth of undies for $20, these will probably give you sticker shock. If you’re used to buying Calvin Klein, however, with the loyalty rewards, these are a great deal.

Overall, the more I learn about TomboyX, the more I love it. I highly recommend that you support them. I know that price can be a huge concern; but with that being said, I’ve been wearing TomboyX for a while and can say that the product is quality and their products hold up. Moreover, I feel comfortable saying that I this is a company I can also support with a clear conscience. The company is earth eco-friendly, and they pay their employees a livable wage, which makes the slightly higher cost worth paying. Lastly, they had my body in mind when they created these clothes; and they have your body in mind, too.

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Our Truth Isn’t Your Trend

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Non-binary Genderfluid Non-conforming Agender Trend

Highlighting non-binary people in the media is important and is slowly happening more-and more; but what’s also important is realizing that being non-binary isn’t a fun fashion trend.

Recently, there has been a huge rise in non-binary representation in the media. Models, musicians, and actors who identify as non-binary/agender/genderfluid/non-conforming are getting the buzz they deserve after not having been represented in mainstream media for such a long time. It’s refreshing to see non-binary folks presented to the public on a larger scale; but something that needs to be said is this: non-binary existence is not a temporary statement, and our truth isn’t your trend. Thinking positively, this rise of representation should continue to skyrocket in months and years to come.

Non-binary Genderfluid Non-conforming Agender Trend

Cover of Vogue August 2017.

What prompted this piece was the backlash aimed at the August 2017 issue of Vogue which featured Zayn Malik and Gigi Hadid on the cover with the tagline, “Shop Each Other’s Closets”. Styling cis people in a gynandrous way is nothing new — this is fashion, sweetie —  but the choice of the models that was made by Vogue made being gender-fluid or non-binary seem as though it were the newest, late-summer/early-fall trend. The August cover would have been more refreshing to see celebrities or models who actually identify as non-conforming grace the cover of Vogue (*cough*,Anna Wintour … girl. You approved this?). A simple Google search of genderfluid/non-binary celebrities could have steered the Vogue editorial staff in the direction of hiring actual non-binary people to grace the cover.  Nevertheless, it is exciting to see non-binary individuals gain tons of positive attention in different areas of the art world; and in the images below, I’d like to showcase a few.



Non-binary Genderfluid Non-conforming Agender TrendRuby Rose — an Australian, genderfluid actor, model, and DJ that presently prefers to use feminine pronouns — has most recently been cast as the leading role of Batwoman in the the CW Network’s forthcoming series of the same name. (Fingers crossed that the show does not flop and is actually a success!) Rose landed some of her largest fame when she appeared in seasons 3 and 4 of Netflix’s original series, Orange Is The New Black. Mind you, Rose appeared in only 9 episodes:



Non-binary Genderfluid Non-conforming Agender TrendAlok Vaid-Menon from College Station, Texas rose to fame as one half of the poetry duo, DarkMatter with Janani Balasubramanian. Alok has been a vocal social and political activist for feminists and the LGBTQ+ community for many years. Alok now has a book of poems entitled, “Femme In Public”, which was released in 2017 and has been featured on LogoTV, in Out Magazine, as well as in Vogue. (Hello, Anna? It’s me again … Put Alok on the cover. *wink*).



Non-binary Genderfluid Non-conforming Agender TrendRose McGowan recently came out as non-binary identifying. Rose has been a vocal proponent for the #MeToo movement (founded by Tarana Burke in 2006) and shattering what was left of the glass ceiling in Hollywood by speaking out against sexual assault and harassment towards women, men, and the trans community. Rose’s book Brave was published in January 2018 from Harper Collins imprint HarperOne., The memoir focuses on the experiences McGowan had in Hollywood both professionally and with sexual assault. Rose recently won GQ’s Man Of The Year Award for her activism — a kind affirmation of non-binary identity from a publication that largely panders to cis, straight audiences.

 



Non-binary Genderfluid Non-conforming Agender TrendAngel Haze is a rapper from Detroit who identifies as agender. Angel has become a huge name in hip-hop and has been nominated for a GLAAD Media Award as well as an MTV Video Music Award. Angel is currently working on their sophomore album. Angel Haze recently changed their name to ROES, but still remains on social media under their original stage name.



These are just few names of many non-binary/non-conforming/agender/genderfluid people that are making big waves presenting themselves to the public loudly so that they are being seen. No one will soon  be forgetting a single one of them anytime soon, because, again, our truth isn’t your trend. These non-binary/agender people are beacons of light, giving people within our community hope that they can achieve the same level of exposure, fame, and greatness that these folk have. Their presence just affirms that we can change the way we are displayed in the media. We are here to be seen, to grace magazine covers, lend our voices and our images to the masses.

Many non-conforming individuals have been subject to bullying and prejudice throughout their childhoods; and most still experience it in adulthood. It all comes from people with a lack of exposure to, as well as a lack of education on the subject of, people who neither label themselves to meet a certain gender-specific criteria that is the summation of eons of destructive societal constructs. Because in spite of what the LGBTQ+ community’s flag may boast, the lives of non-binary people are not all rainbows and glitter for most of us. That being said, however, increasing the visibility of our community by seeing people from it become big-name stars is an important thing as it not only inspires us to make sure ourselves are being represented, but also exposes cis people/straight people who do not identify the same way as non-conforming folks to the lush diversity of this community. They can see that we are all human and that we are all going through life just as they are with very similar difficulties, trials, and tribulations. It also aids in educating them by increasing visibility of the way we present ourselves to the world by showing them that this is not a scary thing. It’s not terrifying at all. It’s our truth and it isn’t their trend. The point begins and ends here: we nonbinary, agender, non-conforming, and genderfluid people are here,  we exist, we are making change, and we aren’t afraid to take charge. We are carving out our space in pop culture and the media, and we aren’t going anywhere anytime soon.

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EXCLUSIVE: Adam Hancock Releases Jacock Men’s Underwear

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Jacock Adam Hancock Underwear Men Ripcord

Adam Hancock isn’t just modeling underwear behind the bar of Ripcord anymore — now he’s created his own fashion line of men’s underwear.

(HOUSTON) – When it comes to underwear, nobody knows the topic better than the man who wears nothing but them as he’s serving up cocktails behind the inside counter at Montrose’s favorite leather bar, Ripcord. His name is Adam Hancock, and if you’ve ever been inside the watering hole located at 715 Fairview in Montrose, you’ve probably see him there serving up drinks clad in nothing but his skivvies. From the customers come no complaints — Hancock certainly does have the sort of body that constitutes showing off. But aside from his muscular frame, something patrons have noted isn’t just the fact that he is wearing underwear, but the brands of underwear he would wear. But for those who have been paying attention as of late, the brand worn most recently probably isn’t one they’d been familiar with before. After all, it was an invention of his own creation.

Jacock Adam Hancock Underwear Men Ripcord

Photo by Adam Hancock + Co.

That’s right. Just last week, bartender and newly-minted entrepreneur, Adam Hancock, released his own brand of men’s underwear under the name Jacock — a name he created using the initials of his first and middle name, plus the ‘-cock’ of his last name. As described on the official Jacock website,

“Gone are the days you have to tolerate crotch wedgies, sweaty balls, chafing and scratchy fabric.”

It continues by saying that, “Jacocks are the only underwear made for male comfort, support, flexibility and style,” describing that this is done by using breathable fabric, a support pouch for the penis and testicles which Hancock affection refers to as “Adam’s pouch”, comfortable elastic waist banding, hand-selected fabrics, and custom designs. With Hancock’s line of underwear contoured for the male anatomy, he’s created a line that utilizes science and style to enhance the experience of men’s underwear.

Jacock Adam Hancock Underwear Men Ripcord

Photo courtesy of www.Jacock.com

Talking exclusively to About Magazine about the Jacock brand, Adam Hancock sat down with About Magazine’s fashion columnist, Stoo Gogo.


Stoo Gogo: First and foremost, tell me about yourself.

Adam Hancock: I’m from Arkansas. I moved to Houston eight years ago and started working as a go-go dancer. Nowadays you can find me either napping or slinging drinks at Ripcord in Houston wearing my Jacocks.

What are your intentions for creating the underwear line Jacock?

I’ve been working on Jacock for almost a year now. Of course, I never realized how much effort it was going to take to build the brand and the company. It’s been an amazing learning experience. Jacock is a problem-solutions brand. I want to make men’s lives better by giving them an underwear product that’s comfortable, flexible, and supportive — so they can feel good, simply. But over the years, you wouldn’t believe how many underwear I’ve bought and tried that really missed the mark. I choose fabric that’s flexible, plus all our underwear has a pouch (what I call, “Adam’s pouch”). It provides your assets support and prevents chafing. 97% of men hang either left or right. Only 3% of men (usually those 2.75 inches of package) hang straight. Traditional underwear is made for that 3% of the male population; but Jacock is here to change that.

Jacock Adam Hancock Underwear Men Ripcord

Photo by Adam Hancock + Co.

There are many male underwear brands on the rise. Why do you think underwear is important for self-expression personally and sexually?

Attitudes are contagious. I want guys to feel good, be relaxed and confident, and not all bunched up tight. Jacock underwear is more than just for self-expression. Actually, it’s more about self-confidence. When you are truly confident with what you have, who you are as a person, it translates to feeling good and eventually shows in every aspect of your life.

What is the vibe for this collection and the future of Jacock?

The first collection, which launched [at the time of this interview] 5 days ago, is really about the basics, our foundation styles. My first drawing board ideas were about getting down to what matters, what I really wanted this underwear to do. The vibe of the collection is: simple, sexy, classy.

In the coming months, we will be more risqué. We will be expanding into jockstraps and different styles of briefs while still ensuring comfort, support, and flexibility. It’s exciting to finally tell you all about Jacock.

Jacock Adam Hancock Underwear Men Ripcord

Photo by Adam Hancock + Co.


Follow Jacock Online

Facebook | Instagram | Website

Adam would like to thank his friends who aided him in the photography taken above. 

Contributions to this article were made by Anthony Ramirez. 

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Boi-ish.wav

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Style.wav gin martini stoo gogo

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Style.wav, No. 1: LU/X

Style.wav is a recurring fashion and beauty multimedia column created by Stoo Gogo & Gin Martini. This first installment features LGBTQ synth-pop artist LU/X (Luis Cerda), styling by Gin Martini, and creative direction by Stoo Gogo. 

Inspired by the visuals created by local band Wild Moccasins with Dario Robleto for their exciting new record, Look Together, Stoo Gogo and Gin Martini travel with up-and-coming, LGBQT synth-pop artist Luis Cerda (artistically known as LU/X) on a fantastical journey towards finding the freedom within music and beyond.

Photo by Stoo Gogo.

Stoo Gogo: What are your influences as a musician?

LU/X: My influences often vary. Growing up we didn’t have cable, so I just grew up listening to Mexican artists like Juan Gabriel or Gloria Trevi. It wasn’t until I got the internet when I found artists like Gaga and CHVRCHES, just to name a few. Around 18, is when I started to enjoy pop music. It would take me to a whole different world. I didn’t know why I connected with it, but it just felt right. But lately, most of my influences are 80s or synth-pop driven. CHVRCHES, M83, and Depeche Mode are my current favorites.

 

Photo by Stoo Gogo.

How would you describe your style as an entertainer?

It’s a forever work in progress. Most of my style started with me accessorizing my insecurities with masks and face makeup. Now, I am venturing more into taking risks. If I could dress the music I’m working on now it would be colorful with elements of grunge. It’s all about freedom. Sometimes when I create new songs I imagine what I’m wearing.

Photo by Stoo Gogo.

How do you view your queerness within your work?

I’m starting to use [queerness] as a way to educate people. Especially for people who are stuck in a close-minded realm. I feel I am there, but I want to show people what it means to be queer. A song I’m working on now called “Oh, the Moonlight” is inspired by being gay as fuck [and] dancing. It’s actually inspired by you, Stoo, when I watch you dance. I even have one song talking about an ex. It’s hella personal and it’s very straight-forward about what happened in that relationship.

Photo by Stoo Gogo.

What are your plans with your music in 2018?

I definitely want to finally want to put it all out there. I’m sitting on so many songs right now. For me, I’m growing into this mentality of independence. Something about that makes me feel good. If people like it, heck yeah. If they don’t … heck ya. The vibe of the new music is about a good time on a Friday night. You know, like, when I go out to Barbarella. I get so much freedom going out, but a lot of people feel self conscious dancing at the club. And with this [project] you don’t have to.

Photo by Stoo Gogo.


And now a little more from Stoo & Gin:

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”8838″ img_size=”medium”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”3/4″][vc_column_text]GIN MARTINI is a fashion and beauty contributor for About Magazine. She is also behind the looks of some of your favorite local drag artists. Between Running Gin Martini DesignsGin Martini Music, and teaching the youth how to sew over at Workshop Houston, she has been the go-to-gal for Last Minute Style. From Pride Superstar winner 2015 to Face Award nominee for Fashion Design of the Year, Gin is here to give you the Inside look at queer fashion in Houston, Texas. Gin lives in and works from Houston, Texas.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”8914″ img_size=”medium”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”3/4″][vc_column_text]STOO GOGO is a fashion and beauty contributor for About Magazine. Though he is known as the other half of BLING ST. (a local Pop band that received billing as the #1 Houston Album of 2017 by the Houston Chronicle), Stoo has always utilized fashion as a tool within his creative and personal lives. By collaborating with Gin Martini, Stoo is ready to explore the fabulosity living in Houston. He lives in and works from Houston, Texas.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Addicted Dives into Summer with a ‘Splash’

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Addicted Splash Menswear Summer Gay Fashion

Addicted Sportswear Dives into Summer with its ‘Splash’ Collection

Addicted Splash Menswear Summer Gay Fashion

Photo by Leonardo Corredor.

In celebration of summer, Addicted, the naughty little sister brand of ES Collection,  has unveiled its steamiest swim collection ever, “Splash.”    “This summer’s swimwear collection features bright, bold colors with one of a kind prints and tongue-and-cheek slogans,” explains the collections’ founder, Ed Suner.  “It’s playful, fun, a bit racy but also sporty, stylish, and designed to last so guys can enjoy the summer sun to its maximum.” 

“Addicted has never been known for subtle details, and this summer’s collection of swim gear is certainly no exception to that rule,” laughs Nir Zilberman, the brand’s USA agent.  “I’d venture to say ‘Splash’ is  Addicted’s wildest collection yet!”

Photo by Leonardo Corredor.

“‘Splash’ offers the quality, fit and comfort the Addicted brand is known for,” says designer Carmen Monforte.  “All gear is designed with fashionable gay men in mind.  They are intended for guys who feel good about themselves, are comfortable with their bodies and are daring enough to flaunt it.” 

Suits are made from fast drying, high stretch, lightweight fabric that is heat moulded for reduced seams and a contoured fit.   There is a wide range of designs in the collection from star, graffiti, floral and camouflage prints to shark and warrior motifs.  Some are emblazoned with tongue-in-cheek sayings like “Top/Bttm,” “Harder than a Rock,” “Slap Me” and “Slut,”  and some contain a removable pack up insert for extra boost and comfort.
As always, all garments are finely and meticulously crafted by Addicted’s superior artisan team.  “As a men’s fashion label, materials and craftsmanship are top priority,” Monforte continues.  “More time is put into the sewing of each piece so that they are built to last, even through the roughest summer play.  The suits are tailored to fit every body type perfectly.”

Photo by Leonardo Corredor.

 The pictorial campaign, directed by the renowned photographer Leonardo Corredor, captures the sexually charged side of Addicted’s “Splash” collection. 

Addicted is the sister line from ES Collection, the popular men’s athletic wear company. Since  2009, the brand has been dedicated to the design, manufacturing and sale of men’s underwear, swimwear, and sportswear.  It was founded by Eduardo Suner, also the founder of ES Collection, and has distinguished itself by setting trends and pushing the envelope in stylish, sexy and very wearable men’s fashion.  
Addicted’s “Splash” collection is sold directly at Addicted.es,  as well as at select retail partners worldwide.
Addicted Splash Menswear Summer Gay Fashion

Photo by Leonardo Corredor.

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Addicted Brings ‘AD Fetish’ Summer Line to Retailers

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AD Fetish Addicted Kink Menswear Clothing Fashion 1

Menswear Line, AD Fetish by Addicted, Brings Summer Lovin’ into the Sex Dungeon

(NEW YORK CITY) – Ever since Olympic medallist and figure skater Adam Rippon showed up on the Oscars red carpet last month in an S&M inspired tuxedo that included a leather harness and bow tie, fetish has been everywhere! Now Addicted, the popular men’s wear line, is luring guys even deeper into the forbidden subculture with AD Fetish, their edgy collection of kink wear. The collection features stylish tank tops, jock straps, harnesses, singlets, lingerie, leather items and even cock rings, finely and meticulously crafted by Addicted’s superior artisan team. “Customers were craving a harder line of gear that re-imagined the Addicted brand for the S&M scene,” explains founder Eduardo Suner. “Our AD Fetish collection blends fashion with erotica. It offers the same quality, fit and comfort found in our popular sports collection, but as the new summer campaign depicts, takes the fun into the dark, steamy depths of the sex dungeon.”

AD Fetish Addicted Kink Menswear Clothing Fashion 1

Photo by Leonardo Corredor

“The gear doesn’t just look good, it feels good,” continues Nir Zilberman, the brand’s USA agent. “The leather is softer than traditional fetish gear. Shirts and pants are tailored to fit every body shape perfectly. And while traditional fetish wear breaks or rips quickly, AD Fetish is built to last, even through the roughest play.”

“The team has had fun experimenting with materials such as rubber, leather, and transparencies for these latest creations,” says designer Carmen Monforte. “We were also careful to keep in mind the significance a particular color has to the community and the very specific message it delivers,” she adds. Traditionally, colors have been used to depict a guy’s sexual preference from blue meaning DTF to red, a more aggressive DTF, and yellow (DTF with water).

AD Fetish is the first fetish line from Addicted, the popular men’s wear company. Since 2009, the brand has been dedicated to the design, manufacturing and sale of men’s underwear, swimwear, and sportswear. It was founded by Eduardo Suner, also the founder of ES Collection, and has distinguished itself by setting trends and pushing the envelope in stylish, sexy and very wearable men’s fashion.

The AD Fetish collection is sold directly at www.adfetish.com, as well as at select retail partners worldwide.

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Addicted Sportswear Launches Spring Collection

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Lust Addicted Fashion Underwear LGBTQ

Addicted Sportswear Launches The Spring Season of Love with its ‘Lust’ Collection

In celebration of the spring season of love, Addicted, the naughty little sister brand of ES Collection,  has unveiled its “Lust” underwear collection.    “This season’s underwear collection is highly sensual and sexual but with a sense of humor,” explains the collections’ founder, Ed Suner.  “It’s sassy, jovial, and ironic but also fresh, sporty and stylish.”  The “Lust” collection features tight-fitting briefs in fire-y flames, neon leopard and superhero prints, emblazoned with tongue-in-cheek sayings like “Horny,” “Love Me Hard,” “Ready to Milk” and “High Class Hooker.”
“‘Lust’ offers the quality, fit and comfort Addicted has become famous for,” continues designer Carmen Monforte.   “All gear is designed with fashionable gay men in mind.  They are intended for guys who feel good about themselves, are comfortable with their bodies and are daring enough to be overtly racy.”
As always, all garments in the collection are finely and meticulously crafted by Addicted’s superior artisan team.  “As a men’s fashion label, materials and craftsmanship are top priority,” Monforte confirms.  “More time is put into the sewing of each garment so that they are built to last, even through the roughest play.  They are tailored to fit every body type perfectly.”
Lust Addicted Fashion Underwear
“They’re also interchangeable,”  adds Nir Zilberman, the brand’s USA agent.  “They’re perfectly suited to be worn on the field and in the bed.  Who says sports briefs can’t be sexy too?”
The pictorial campaign, directed by the renowned photographer Leonardo Corredor, captures the steamy side of Addicted’s “Lust” collection.  The provocative images have  been a big hit on the brand’s social media.
Addicted is the sister line from Addicted, the popular men’s athletic wear company. Since  2009, the brand has been dedicated to the design, manufacturing and sale of men’s underwear, swimwear, and sportswear.  It was founded by Eduardo Suner, also the founder of ES Collection, and has distinguished itself by setting trends and pushing the envelope in stylish, sexy and very wearable men’s fashion.  
Addicted’s “Lust” collection is sold directly at addicted.es,  as well as at select retail partners worldwide.
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9 Celebrities who have spoken out about being photoshopped

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