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T-Time, hosted by Drew O’Hara and Andy Tamez, is making a splash in the Galveston gay waters, as both hosts tackle island rumors and do their best to set the record straight.

(GALVESTON) – About Magazine sat down last month to talk to Drew and Andy about how their popular Facebook Live show came to be, how its popularity has grown, and what they’d like to do to give back to Galveston’s LGBTQIA community. The two best friends opened up about these topics and so much more. They stated that even though their show seems gossipy, “that is not what they focus on.” In fact, when asked, their end goals include promoting local talent, entertainers, and trying to bridge gaps within the community.

Read more below.


About Magazine: What inspired the show?

Drew O’Hara: It came for me by having different groups of people that would hang out in different locations on the island. Then, to hear someone say something about someone else, and that information would relayed by someone else from a third party, and it would blow up to something bigger. When originally what was said was not offensive but got telephoned into something offensive. It was happening all the time, this miscommunication, this ‘he-said-she-said’ telephone game. It was putting us in the middle because we are friends with everyone.

[The show] is about hearing it from the horses mouth. If you have something to say, come say it here.

tt1 Sipping the Galveston "T"
Photo by David Guerra

Andy Tamez: It became a lot, and it was hard to hear everybody just going back and forth. It got to the point where it was holding people accountable for what [they’re] doing and saying. It was stressing us out, so we were like,  “You know what? We’ll just put this on [Facebook] Live. And that’s what started it. Then we had people that wanted to come on the show and talk about certain things. The whole premise of the show was to have a platform to come in and tell your own story, say your truth, and own up to your actions.

What are the topics you cover?

DO: We have different segments. We have people come on the show to talk about things that are going on around the area. We will interview someone like special sponsors that sponsor certain events that are happening in town. T-Time was predominantly […] somebody saying what’s on their mind, but that is not what we focus on. Now we have segments, if you watch the show. We do the ending of our show with [a segment called] “What Would You Do?”. It’s just a way to communicate with somebody while also getting the information out there in a way that people will pay attention to.

Who is your audience?

AT: It’s a pretty large demographic. It ranges anywhere from Galveston to Houston. And we are finding that even straight people are watching the show. As I went to Chick-Fil-A, some girl was there saying, “Hey! You’re the one doing that Facebook show!”

DO:  She said, “Y’all are Drandy!” And we were like, “Yes … We have no idea who you are, but thank you.”

AT: We had no idea we had an audience the way we do.

tt2 Sipping the Galveston "T"
Photo by David Guerra

DO: It’s being called the local talk show. So it went from T-Time to just saying what is on your mind to helping community members get their thoughts out there to actually graduating to plugging any events. And now it’s just all three of them combined. We want to just help the community, and we are ripping off all of these Band-Aids. We have already seen a change. There are always new events going on, on the island, so there is always going to be something going on that we can stream out, and revitalize and actually get the concept out and see the changes of individuals. We get an average of fifty audience members that will watch live, but HUNDREDS that will watch after we air off.

Who do you interview and why?

DO: Local community leaders that we find beneficial to help get the information out. For example, Kiki Dion Van Wales. She is not only the show director here at 23rd [Street Station], but she is the owner of Pride Galveston. We interviewed her because we wanted to get the information out there to let people know this is where the donations are, this is how it’s working, this is what it’s going towards. Just using Kiki as an example. We want to give Galveston as much attention as possible, and help the community as well. Because if we can help, we’re going to.

How is the feedback when you air off?

DO: Depends on the timing. If we have a guest on the show that ripped someone apart, then we would have people that were very aggravated. So we had something for a while when things got a little shaky called Make-Up Mondays where the next day we have to go in and be like you know this is what’s going on, mend it, and assure our audience realizes we weren’t trying to be assholes.

tt4 Sipping the Galveston "T"
Photo by David Guerra

What are you doing with your popularity?

AT: It’s very humbling and surprising. I didn’t think that it was going to be like this at all,

DO: I thought it was just going to be our friends watching, and then one we started hitting hundreds of views, we were like, “Oh, shit! People are actually watching.” Our popularity has grown by each show.

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