Home Dating News Houston Gay Interracial Couple Explains Their Love

Houston Gay Interracial Couple Explains Their Love

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Gay Houston Interracial Couple Detail The Endurance Of Their Relationship 

(HOUSTON) — On the humid summer night of July 11, 1958, Richard and Mildred Loving lay asleep when armed police burst into their bedroom and arrested the newlyweds. In 1958 twenty-four states had laws prohibiting interracial marriages.

The case would become to know as the historic Loving v. VirginiaA U.S. Supreme Court victory that set aside laws prohibiting interracial marriages. The last law officially prohibiting interracial marriage was repealed in Alabama in 2000.

Houston-Gay-A-Interracial-Couple-Explain-Their-Love Houston Gay Interracial Couple Explains Their Love
Photo: Reza Nouri

Fast forward to June 26th, 2015, when the United States Supreme Court that state level bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional. The historic ruling came nearly forty-six years after New York’s Stonewall Inn riots.

After visually combining both monumental civil rights victories. Step into the lives of two gay men in an interracial relationship in Houston.

Reza Nouri and Cameron Phillips met about 3 years ago in Montrose. Phillips was getting his hair cut at Hollywood Hair and Nails Salon, a small boutique saloon Nouri has owned since 2003.

“We instantly got on the subject of his home country and its current state of affairs,” Phillips explains of their immediate connection on an intellectual level. Nouri moved to the United States from Tehran, Iran. “I could see and hear the passion he had in him. He wasn’t bad looking either.”

The pair instantly saw something in one another that later became a solid relationship. But it was the hardships the couple would receive because of their races, which would be the true test of their commitment to one other.

The backlash the couple has endured because of their different worlds in the sense of culture and race has been nasty sometimes. “But there are always nasty people out there,” Nouri explains. “Houston and Montrose have been very accepting of me and us.”

In Philips’ opinion, his partner constantly receives the blunt of the prejudice. “He always has to explain who he is and why he is here,” Phillips explains of his partner’s ethnicity. “He is very sensitive about [his race], and rightfully so.”

Phillip’s describes how his partner Nouri is the most patriotic American. “He is by far the most patriotic person I know,” Phillips describes. “It’s not hollow patriotism like waving a flag and chanting USA! USA!”… It’s a deep sense of duty and loyalty to his adopted homeland… it’s really one of my favorite things about him. It’s genuine.”

In the year 2017 it is amazing that we are finally able to celebrate a same sex interracial couple who stands equally under the law.

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